Google tops Ipsos real-time, nonconscious ranking of Super Bowl ads

Super Bowl LIII, photo courtesy of NFL

Lindsay Franke

Lindsay
Franke
Senior Vice President, US, Creative Excellence
This contact is NOT an Expert

Pedr Howard

Pedr
Howard
Senior Vice President, US, Creative Excellence
This contact is NOT an Expert

Manuel Garcia-Garcia

Manuel
Garcia-Garcia
Senior Vice President, Ipsos Science Organization
This contact is NOT an Expert
Sports
Neurosciences
Advertising
Super Bowl LIII, photo courtesy of NFL
New Services

Chicago, IL — Google inspired the highest emotional engagement in Ipsos’ second annual real-time test. Unlike other such experiments, Ipsos tests the ads in a realistic situation by recruiting an audience of 37 people to watch the ads, during the game, at a Super Bowl party. Participants could even bring friends. Each viewer was fitted with Shimmer’s NeuroLynQ system – a wrist bracelet and finger sensor to passively capture galvanic skin response (GSR). This allowed Ipsos to measure emotional engagement passively throughout the game and every commercial aired in the Chicago area, where the viewing party took place. This data can now be used to decode which ads had the strongest emotional impact on the audience during the event itself – not when tested in isolation. Last year, Tide detergent edged out the NFL and M&Ms in the Ipsos ranking.

Along with the usual celebrities and animals, two big themes emerged in the commercials. On one hand, many of the ads were about looking back, with nostalgic appearances from favorite characters like Buffy the Vampire Slayer, The Dude from, “The Big Lebowski, Sex and the City’s Carrie Bradshaw, the Backstreet Boys and even Andy Warhol.  Other ads looked forward, with robots featuring in ads for Turbo Tax, Michelob Ultra and Sprint, and voice-assistants for Mercedes, Pringles and - of course – Amazon Alexa.

The top 10 ads, based on highest peak emotional response, were:

  1. Google (100 billion words)
  2. Amazon Alexa
  3. SimpliSafe
  4. T-Mobile (Lyft Driver)
  5. Toyota (Rav4)
  6. Mint Mobile (Chunky Milk)
  7. Doritos (Chance the Rapper and the Backstreet Boys)
  8. T-Mobile (Keep it brief)
  9. Pepsi
  10. Mercedes Benz (A-Class)

“We believe this is a markedly different ranking system to most used in the industry for two reasons,” said Manuel Garcia-Garcia of the Ipsos Science Organization. “First, it is entirely based on nonconscious reactions and second, the data was collected during the event itself, reflecting the real world response and context around the Super Bowl.”

Google got the highest emotional reaction in its “100 billion words spot” during a scene featuring political protests. T-Mobile had a strong campaign with high branded recall and three ads in the top 15 of the Ipsos ranking.

“On average, the ads showed less engagement than last year’s crop of Super Bowl spots,” said Ipsos’ Pedr Howard. “Not surprisingly, given the historic lack of touchdowns for most of the game, the overall score for the game was noticeably lower than the Patriots vs. Eagles contest of 2018. The $5.25 million question is whether the game itself impacts the engagement with the ads or whether we saw a dip in creative quality.”

Some longer-running Super Bowl ad meters are based on recall, or manual ratings. Only recently has the technology reached a point where Ipsos’ and Shimmer’s nonconscious methodology has even been possible. Brand recall is also a helpful metric for judging the impact of commercials. After the game, Ipsos asked its audience about the most memorable commercials. T-Mobile, Verizon, Budweiser, Bud Light and Pepsi had the highest recall. All but Budweiser aired multiple spots throughout the game, which is known to help with recall. Budweiser had the highest recall of the advertisers that only aired one spot. The importance of combining conscious and non-conscious responses was demonstrated by the Doritos spot, which cracked the top 10 on the emotional ranking, but when it came to recall some audience members said they liked the “Chance the Rapper and Backstreet Boys” commercial without naming the sponsor itself.

For more information on this news release, please contact:

Lindsay Franke
Head of Creative Excellence, US
+1 (312) 665-0571
lindsay.franke@ipsos.com

Pedr Howard
Senior Vice President, US
+1 (203) 919-3474
pedr.howard@ipsos.com

Manuel Garcia-Garcia, PhD
Senior Vice President, Ipsos Science Organization
+1 (929) 313-3609
manuel.garcia-garcia@ipsos.com

About Ipsos

Ipsos is an independent market research company controlled and managed by research professionals. Founded in France in 1975, Ipsos has grown into a worldwide research group with a strong presence in all key markets. Ipsos ranks fourth in the global research industry.

With offices in 89 countries, Ipsos delivers insightful expertise across five research specializations: brand, advertising and media; customer loyalty; marketing; public affairs research; and survey management.

Ipsos researchers assess market potential and interpret market trends. They develop and build brands. They help clients build long-term relationships with their customers. They test advertising and study audience responses to various media and they measure public opinion around the globe.

Ipsos has been listed on the Paris Stock Exchange since 1999 and generated global revenues of €1,780.5 million in 2017.

Ipsos repeats its unique contextual, biometric ranking
Business Contact
  • Virginia Sentiment Toward its Government

    Thumbnail Image

    Chris Jackson

    Chris
    Jackson
    Vice President, US, Public Affairs
    This contact is NOT an Expert
    Politics
    Government
    Public opinion
    Public Sector
    Thumbnail Image
    Society

    Washington, DC - Ipsos together with the University of Virginia Center for Politics to understand how Virginians feel about recent political scandals. The full press release can be found here: http://crystalball.centerforpolitics.org/crystalball/articles/new-virginia-poll-northam-approval-weak-but-virginians-not-demanding-his-resignation/.

    The survey was conducted using the web-enabled Ipsos KnowledgePanel, a probability-based panel designed to be representative of the U.S. population. Initially, participants are chosen scientifically by a random selection of telephone numbers and residential addresses. Persons in selected households are then invited by telephone or by mail to participate in the web-enabled KnowledgePanel. For those who agree to participate, but do not already have Internet access, Ipsos provides at no cost a laptop and ISP connection. People who already have computers and Internet service are permitted to participate using their own equipment. Panelists then receive unique log-in information for accessing surveys online, and then are sent emails throughout each month inviting them to participate in research. 

    Standard sourcing language for external media public release efforts:

    The study was conducted online with Ipsos’s KnowledgePanel Omnibus. The KnowledgePanel is the largest probability-based panel designed to be representative of the US general population, including non-internet households by providing them with web-enabled devices. The study consisted of 636 interviews with a representative sample of Virginia residents, aged 18+, conducted between February 15th and 19th, 2019. The margin of sampling error at the 95% confidence level is +/-4 percentage points. The study includes N=289 self-identified Democrats and N=299 Republicans.
     

    An Ipsos and University of Virginia Center for Politics study
    Business Contact
  • Americans report a bipartisan desire for transparent political financing laws

    US Polling

    Chris Jackson

    Chris
    Jackson
    Vice President, US, Public Affairs
    This contact is NOT an Expert
    Polling
    Politics
    Public Sector
    US Polling
    Society

    Washington, DC, February 18, 2019 — An Ipsos poll on behalf of the Center for Public Integrity reveals bipartisan agreement for transparent political financing laws and dissatisfaction with the role of money in politics. Two-thirds of Americans believe that American presidential campaigns should occur over a limited time frame compared to just 14% of whom believing there should be no limit to campaign time lengths. Between Democrats (72%) and Republicans (68%), agreement is nearly the same.

    Americans also advocate transparency in the election system with 88% believing political TV ads should be required to say who paid for the ad and 87% believing online ads should be required to say who paid for the ad. Compared to a similar survey last year, the rate of agreement remains nearly the same (85% for TV ads and 84% for online ads), but the intensity of agreement has increased, showing Americans have become even more in favor of political transparency. A December 2017 survey showed that 57% of Americans strongly believe TV ads should say who paid for them and the same proportion believe online ads should say so. Comparatively, this year’s survey shows 64% and 65% of Americans are in strong agreement with each statement, respectively.

    In the same one-year timespan, Americans report a slight decrease in their belief that American elections are fair and open. Less than half (42%) believe elections are fair and open compared to 50% of Americans who believed so last year. When Americans think of elections, they place a great deal of emphasis on the influence of money. Sixty-five percent of Americans believe that politicians need a lot of money to win elections and even more (85%) believe that elected officials return favors for those who contribute greatly to their campaigns. Americans aren’t optimistic about changing money’s role in politics with 59% reporting that they believe powerful people will always find a way to use their wealth to gain political influence. At the same time, however, 64% recognize that being able to donate money to political campaigns is a vital form of free speech.

     


    About the Study

    These are findings from an Ipsos poll conducted January 23 - 24, 2019. For the survey, a sample of 1,005 Americans age 18+ from the continental U.S., Alaska and Hawaii were interviewed online in English. The sample includes 358 Republicans, 336 Democrats, and 202 Independents. The sample for this study was randomly drawn from Ipsos’s online panel (see link below for more info on “Access Panels and Recruitment”), partner online panel sources, and “river” sampling (see link below for more info on the Ipsos “Ampario Overview” sample method) and does not rely on a population frame in the traditional sense. Ipsos uses fixed sample targets, unique to each study, in drawing sample. After a sample has been obtained from the Ipsos panel, Ipsos calibrates respondent characteristics to be representative of the U.S. Population using standard procedures such as raking-ratio adjustments. The source of these population targets is U.S. Census 2016 American Community Survey data. The sample drawn for this study reflects fixed sample targets on demographics. Post-hoc weights were made to the population characteristics on gender, age, race/ethnicity, region, and education. Statistical margins of error are not applicable to online nonprobability sampling polls. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error and measurement error. Where figures do not sum to 100, this is due to the effects of rounding. The precision of Ipsos online polls is measured using a credibility interval. In this case, the poll has a credibility interval of plus or minus 3.5 percentage points for all respondents. Ipsos calculates a design effect (DEFF) for each study based on the variation of the weights, following the formula of Kish (1965). This study had a credibility interval adjusted for design effect of the following (n=1,005, DEFF=1.5, adjusted Confidence Interval=5.0). The poll also has a credibility interval of plus or minus 5.9 percentage points for Republicans, plus or minus 6.1 percentage points for Democrats, and plus or minus 7.9 percentage points for Independents. For more information about conducting research intended for public release or Ipsos’ online polling methodology, please visit our Public Opinion Polling and Communication page where you can download our brochure, see our public release protocol, or contact us.

     

    More than three-quarters believe political ads should report who paid for them
  • Americans report a bipartisan desire for transparent political financing laws

    Political Financing

    Chris Jackson

    Chris
    Jackson
    Vice President, US, Public Affairs
    This contact is NOT an Expert
    Polling
    Politics
    Public Sector
    Political Financing
    Society

    Washington, DC, February 18, 2019 — An Ipsos poll on behalf of the Center for Public Integrity reveals bipartisan agreement for transparent political financing laws and dissatisfaction with the role of money in politics. Two-thirds of Americans believe that American presidential campaigns should occur over a limited time frame compared to just 14% of whom believing there should be no limit to campaign time lengths. Between Democrats (72%) and Republicans (68%), agreement is nearly the same. 

    Americans also advocate transparency in the election system with 88% believing political TV ads should be required to say who paid for the ad and 87% believing online ads should be required to say who paid for the ad. Compared to a similar survey last year, the rate of agreement remains nearly the same (85% for TV ads and 84% for online ads), but the intensity of agreement has increased, showing Americans have become even more in favor of political transparency. A December 2017 survey showed that 57% of Americans strongly believe TV ads should say who paid for them and the same proportion believe online ads should say so. Comparatively, this year’s survey shows 64% and 65% of Americans are in strong agreement with each statement, respectively. 

    In the same one-year timespan, Americans report a slight decrease in their belief that American elections are fair and open. Less than half (42%) believe elections are fair and open compared to 50% of Americans who believed so last year. When Americans think of elections, they place a great deal of emphasis on the influence of money. Sixty-five percent of Americans believe that politicians need a lot of money to win elections and even more (85%) believe that elected officials return favors for those who contribute greatly to their campaigns. Americans aren’t optimistic about changing money’s role in politics with 59% reporting that they believe powerful people will always find a way to use their wealth to gain political influence. At the same time, however, 64% recognize that being able to donate money to political campaigns is a vital form of free speech.

    About the Study

    These are findings from an Ipsos poll conducted January 23 - 24, 2019. For the survey, a sample of 1,005 Americans age 18+ from the continental U.S., Alaska and Hawaii were interviewed online in English. The sample includes 358 Republicans, 336 Democrats, and 202 Independents.

    The sample for this study was randomly drawn from Ipsos’s online panel (see link below for more info on “Access Panels and Recruitment”), partner online panel sources, and “river” sampling (see link below for more info on the Ipsos “Ampario Overview” sample method) and does not rely on a population frame in the traditional sense. Ipsos uses fixed sample targets, unique to each study, in drawing sample. After a sample has been obtained from the Ipsos panel, Ipsos calibrates respondent characteristics to be representative of the U.S. Population using standard procedures such as raking-ratio adjustments. The source of these population targets is U.S. Census 2016 American Community Survey data. The sample drawn for this study reflects fixed sample targets on demographics. Post-hoc weights were made to the population characteristics on gender, age, race/ethnicity, region, and education. 

    Statistical margins of error are not applicable to online nonprobability sampling polls. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error and measurement error. Where figures do not sum to 100, this is due to the effects of rounding. The precision of Ipsos online polls is measured using a credibility interval. In this case, the poll has a credibility interval of plus or minus 3.5 percentage points for all respondents. Ipsos calculates a design effect (DEFF) for each study based on the variation of the weights, following the formula of Kish (1965). This study had a credibility interval adjusted for design effect of the following (n=1,005, DEFF=1.5, adjusted Confidence Interval=5.0). 

    The poll also has a credibility interval of plus or minus 5.9 percentage points for Republicans, plus or minus 6.1 percentage points for Democrats, and plus or minus 7.9 percentage points for Independents. 

    For more information about conducting research intended for public release or Ipsos’ online polling methodology, please visit our Public Opinion Polling and Communication page where you can  download our brochure, see our public release protocol, or 
    contact us.

    For more information on this news release, please contact:

    Chris Jackson
    Vice President, U.S.
    Ipsos Public Affairs
    +1 202 420-2025
    chris.jackson@ipsos.com

    Mallory Newall
    Director, U.S.
    Ipsos Public Affairs
    +1 202 420-2014
    mallory.newall@ipsos.com

    About Ipsos Public Affairs

    Ipsos Public Affairs is a non-partisan, objective, survey-based research practice made up of seasoned professionals. We conduct strategic research initiatives for a diverse number of American and international organizations, based not only on public opinion research, but elite stakeholder, corporate, and media opinion research.

    Ipsos has media partnerships with the most prestigious news organizations around the world. Through our media partnerships, Ipsos Public Affairs is a leading source of intelligent information for businesses and professionals in the U.S., Canada, the UK, and internationally. Ipsos Public Affairs is a member of the Ipsos Group, a leading global survey-based market research company. We provide boutique-style customer service and work closely with our clients, while also undertaking global research.

    About Ipsos

    Ipsos is an independent market research company controlled and managed by research professionals. Founded in France in 1975, Ipsos has grown into a worldwide research group with a strong presence in all key markets. Ipsos ranks fourth in the global research industry.
    With offices in 88 countries, Ipsos delivers insightful expertise across five research specializations: brand, advertising and media; customer loyalty; marketing; public affairs research; and survey management.

    Ipsos researchers assess market potential and interpret market trends. They develop and build brands. They help clients build long-term relationships with their customers. They test advertising and study audience responses to various media and they measure public opinion around the globe.

    Ipsos has been listed on the Paris Stock Exchange since 1999 and generated global revenues of €1,780.5 million in 2017.

    More than three-quarters believe political ads should report who paid for them
  • [EVENT] WTF Live: Food for Thought

    wtf cover
    New Services
    Are we, as humans, ready for the Future of Food? The surprising answers seems to be, “yes!”
    21 Mar 2019
    Chicago, IL

    Are we, as humans, ready for the Future of Food? The surprising answers seems to be, "yes!" And regardless of your industry, the shifts in this category will provide opportunities for all companies.

    Ipsos is delighted to be hosting WTF Live, an exclusive, complimentary and experiential event featuring new Ipsos global research exploring the Future of Food. The evening will feature special guest speakers, and a unique food experience to celebrate the first in a series of WTF Live events in 2019.

    Full agenda to be posted soon.

    This event is by invitation only. To request a guest pass, please contact us.

    Topic
    Market Research
    Geographical Area
  • Nearly Half of Americans Say They Would Feel Sad If Printed Materials No Longer Existed

    Newspaper and print

    Chris Jackson

    Chris
    Jackson
    Vice President, US, Public Affairs
    This contact is NOT an Expert
    Digital
    Online Research
    Newspaper and print
    Society

    Washington, DC, February 14, 2019 — According to a recent online survey conducted by Ipsos on behalf of Canon, adults are most likely to say that if printed materials no longer existed it would make them feel sad (47%). Only 5%, in comparison, say that they would feel happy and very few (1%) would feel relieved. One in five would feel unsure (22%) if print medium no longer existed, while at least one in ten would feel indifferent (14%). Fewer say that the extinction of the print medium would make them feel anxious (6%) or overwhelmed (4%).

    • Women (50% vs. 43% of men), adults over the age of 55 (55% vs. 39% of those age 18-34), and those with a household income of at least $100,000 (53% vs. 44% of those earning less) are among the most likely to say they would be sad if printed materials no longer existed.

    Two thirds believe that print will eventually be phased-out and digital will rule (64%), with those under the age of 55 (68% vs. 57% of those age 55+) and those with children living at home (69% vs. 62% of those with no kids) particularly likely to feel this way. Thinking about the future, more than eight in ten predict that search engines (89%) and TV (84%) will be important to them personally in the year 2030, while roughly three quarters say the same thing of radio (76%), books (76%), and news websites (75%). More than half also believe that social media sites (68%), e-books (53%), print newspapers (52%), and print magazines (50%) will play important roles in their lives in the year 2030, though not quite as many say that audiobooks (44%), magazine websites (44%) and podcasts (42%) will be important to them ten years from now.

    • While a greater proportion of women believe that search engines (91% vs. 86% of men), TV (86% vs. 81%), books (82% vs. 69%), and social media sites (71% vs. 65%) will be important to their lives in the year 2030, men are more likely to think they will rely on magazine websites (47% vs. 41% of women) in the future.
    • Having access to TV (88% of those age 55+ vs. 79% of those age 18-34), print newspapers (59% vs. 44%), and print magazines (57% vs. 43%) in the future is much more likely to be considered important by older respondents, while those under the age of 35 are more likely to say social media sites (81% vs. 55% of those age 55+), e-books (62% vs. 44%), and audiobooks (56% vs. 35%) will be important to them 10 years from now.  

    Despite a majority thinking that print will eventually be phased-out and digital will rule, there are some instances where print if preferred. For instance, just over three quarters say that they prefer reading physical books more than e-books (76%) and similar proportions prefer to send their loved ones printed cards (73%). Another seven in ten say that they like being able to highlight and mark up physical content (70%) – and 76% of students agree that they prefer doing their school reading and assignments on paper as opposed to online.

    When asked about practices that make them feel MOST relaxed and peaceful when dealing with the stresses of daily life, adults are most likely to mention reading a book (48%) as their preferred means to help relieve stress. This is especially true for women (57% vs. 38% of men), adults over the age of 55 (51% vs. 44% of those age 35-54), the more affluent (53% vs. 45% of those earning less than $100,000 annually), and those with a college degree (51% vs. 45% of those with no degree).

    • Roughly two in five say instead that watching streaming services (41%) or exercising (38%) make them feel most relaxed and peaceful, while at least three in ten turn to cooking (33%) or traveling (30%).
    • One in five opt to mediate to cope with the stresses of daily life (21%) and 14% mention something else. Only 6% say that they do not do any of these to help them feel more relaxed when faced with daily stresses.

    Reading physical books is also seen as being beneficial for a variety of reasons, including at least eight in ten who say this can help people learn about history (85%) and different cultures (81%), help to focus attention (82%), and help to reduce stress levels (80%). A similar proportion say that reading physical books can help people become more open-minded (79%) and help them think outside the box (79%), while roughly three quarters also think books can make you feel better when you’re down (77%), enhance creativity (74%), and help to develop problem-solving skills (74%). A majority also say that books can help to focus on the present (72%) and teach people to connect with others (62%) and feel empathy (71%).

    • Young adults are significantly more likely to believe that reading physical books can be very/somewhat impactful in many of these ways, include a greater proportion who believe that books can help uplift spirits when feeling down (83% vs. 73% of those age 55+), boost creativity (79% vs. 68%), and help teach people to connect with others (69% vs. 56%).

    For three quarters, the quality and graphics of print is very important to catching their attention (76%) – though only 39% agree that they prefer content with less text and more graphics (vs. 56% who disagree with this statement). In fact, text (50%) is the feature most likely to make printed materials stand out to adults, followed closely by content (49%) and quality (48%). At least two in five say that graphics (45%) and colors (42%) make printed materials stand out for them, while roughly three in ten say the same thing of personalized material (30%) and textures (27%). Not quite one in ten (8%) say that none of these features make printed materials stand out to them.

    • Those most likely to prefer content that features less text and more graphics include men (44% vs. 35% of women) and younger adults (49% of those age 18-34 vs. 32% of those age 55+).

    Two thirds do admit that they get annoyed when their mailbox is filled with printed ads (66%) and more than half try to avoid printing where they can to help the environment (55%). Women (58% vs. 52% of men), adults under the age of 35 (64% vs. 46% of those age 55+), those with children living at home (60% vs. 53% of those with no children), and those with a college degree (62% vs. 50% of those with no degree) are among the most likely to be conscious of printing in an effort to help the environment.
    More than half agree they were pleased and/or 'proud' to have received an "I voted" sticker (57%) and one in five (21%) posted a picture of their "I voted" sticker online. Those between the ages of 18-34 were much more likely to post a picture of their sticker online (32% vs. 24% of those age 35-54 and 9% of those age 55+).

    Looking more specifically at digital content, just over half admit that overall in their life, they rely more on digital content than physical content (56%) – yet seven in ten agree that the constant barrage of digital information is too much (69%). More than eight in ten say that they scroll past digital advertisements when online (82%) and another six in ten (62%) say that they often find themselves multi-tasking and not fully paying attention to what they are reading when using screens.

    • Those most likely to admit they rely more on digital content than physical content in their overall life include adults under the age of 35 (71% vs. 38% of those age 55+), the more affluent (especially those with a household income of $100,000+) (62% vs. 51% of those earning less than %50,000 annually), those with children living at home (65% vs. 53% of those with no children), and those with a college degree (62% vs. 52% of those with no degree). Adults from these demographic segments also stand out as being particularly more likely to say they do not fully pay attention to what they are reading when using screens.

    When it comes to selecting a platform to accomplish different activities, print is most likely to be preferred when reading a book (60% vs. 27% who prefer using a tablet/smartphone/laptop/desktop) and sending/receiving a greeting card (56% vs. 33% who prefer tablet/smartphone/laptop/desktop).
    On the other hand, Americans are particularly likely to favor using a laptop/desktop when editing a document (68% vs. 11% who prefer print and 9% who prefer smartphone/tablet) or studying/researching (59% vs. 16% who prefer print and 16% who prefer using tablets/ smartphones). Nearly half also say that they prefer using a laptop/desktop when reviewing a report (45%), though one in four instead favor print (25%) and only a few prefer reviewing reports using a smartphone (9%) or tablet (7%).

    Smartphones are the top choice when it comes to keeping track of their day/schedule (43%), though roughly one in five prefer to do this via print (21%) or a laptop/desktop (17%). Opinions are split when it comes to reading the news, with 29% of Americans saying that they prefer to do this on a laptop/desktop, 28% preferring print, and 26% who would opt to read the news on their smartphone (26%). One in ten prefer to read the news using a tablet (10%).

    • Overall, a greater proportion of women and adults over the age of 55 prefer print when undertaking many of the activities listed above, while those between the ages of 18-34 stand out as being particularly likely to enjoy using their smartphone when completing the above tasks.

    Level of Trust in Different Mediums

    Americans are most likely to trust the information they receive via radio (79%), books (78%), search engines sites (78%), reports/ documents (75%), newspapers (74%), and TV (72%). In contrast, they are least likely to trust information that comes from podcasts (44%), social media sites (43%), and online ads (41%). Magazines (68%), online news website (64%), brochures/flyers (61%), print ads (58%), e-books (53%), online magazines (52%), and audiobooks (51%) fall in the middle, with at least half saying that they completely/ somewhat trust the information they receive from these mediums.

    Thinking about how communication campaigns or causes can influence their decisions, TV (76%), news websites (68%), radio (66%), newspapers (64%), and email (60%) are rated as being the most important mediums used. At least half say that social media sites (56%), printed direct mail (55%), and flyers (51%) are important when influencing their decisions, while not quite as many say the same thing about online petitions (47%), posters (46%), and magazines (45%). Banners (41%), magazine websites (37%), and podcasts (36%) are rated as being important mediums for influencing decisions around campaigns or causes by about two in five, while e-books (26%) and audiobooks (25%) are seen as being least important.

    • Young adults are particularly likely to stress the importance of communication about campaigns or causes when making decisions, including a greater proportion who say information transmitted via news websites (72% vs. 61% of those age 55+), e-mail (64% vs. 53%), social media sites (75% vs. 37%), flyers (55% vs. 45%), online petitions (61% vs. 34%), posters (58% vs. 34%), magazine (48% vs. 41%), banners (55% vs. 26%), magazine website (45% vs. 26%), podcasts (54% vs. 20%), e-books (36% vs. 16%), and audiobooks (37% vs. 14%) is important to them.

    Print/Digital Usage

    When it comes to communication using either digital or print, Americans say they use digital most often when communicating with their core group of friends (74% vs. 11% who use print the most and 16% who say this is not applicable), a wider group of friends (75% vs. 10% who use print the most and 15% who say this is not applicable), their extended family (70% vs. 14% print and 16% who say this is not applicable), and even their immediate family (69% vs. 18% who use print the most). More than half (55%) also say that they use digital mediums the most to communicate with work colleagues, versus only 8% who use print – though 36% say this is not applicable. Fewer use digital the most when communication with their spouse (38% vs. 20% who say they use print the most and 42% who say that this is not applicable) or romantic partner (37% vs. 19% print and 43% not applicable).

    Looking at different types of mediums used over the past month, the majority have watched TV (62%), read magazines (54%) and/or books (53%), and listened to the radio (52%). At least a third have read a newspaper (45%), online news (43%), or a brochure/flyer (34%), while nearly one in five have listened to a podcast (18%) or read an e-book (18%). Fewer say that they have read an online magazine (13%) or listened to an audiobook (10%), while only 7% say that they not read/watched/listened to any of these.

    The mediums used most often include TV (90%), search engines (86%), radio (79%), social media sites (76%), online news websites (66%) and books (65%), where at least two thirds say that they use these frequently/sometimes over the course of a typical month. More than half also read magazines (57%) and newspapers (50%). Less than half are reading/listening to brochures/flyers (42%), online magazine websites (30%), e-books (29%), podcasts (28%), and audiobooks (18%) at least sometimes over the course of a typical month.

    When describing their print/digital habits, only in ten (13%) say that they solely use print mediums while one in five (20%) say that they only use digital mediums. The majority instead use a mix of both, with 36% saying they use print to complement digital mediums and 32% who say that they use digital to complement print.

    In the past 12 months, Americans are much more likely to have given someone a printed card (63%) versus sent someone an e-card (24%). In fact, 82% say that they are very/somewhat likely to choose to buy a printed greeting card over a digital card.

    Giving a printed card for Valentine’s Day is also much more common than giving someone an e-card on this occasion (36% vs. 8%), as is receiving a printed invitation and RSVP for a wedding (34% vs. 15% who received a digital invitation and RSVP for a wedding).

    More than half have also used a printed calendar in their home over the past year (56%), while at least one five have used a physical planner (29%) and/or saved an event invite e.g. pinned to board (20%). One in ten have recently mailed postcards while traveling (10%) or collected postcard from cities they've been to (10%).

    Two thirds say that they are likely to buy a painting or print to decorate their home at some point (64%). Nearly half report being likely to select a bottle of wine because of visual appeal/label (47%) and 35% say the same thing of selecting a beer based on its label/box design. A third of Americans say that they are likely to buy a poster from a concert/event to remember the occasion in the future (33%).

     

    About the Study

    These are the findings from an Ipsos poll conducted November 27 - 29, 2018 on behalf of Canon. For the survey, a sample of 2,010 adults ages 18 and over from the continental U.S., Alaska and Hawaii was interviewed online, in English. The precision of Ipsos online polls is measured using a credibility interval. In this case, the poll has a credibility interval of ±2.5 percentage points for all respondents.

    The sample for this study was randomly drawn from Ipsos’s online panel (see link below for more info on “Access Panels and Recruitment”), partner online panel sources, and “river” sampling (see link below for more info on the Ipsos “Ampario Overview” sample method) and does not rely on a population frame in the traditional sense. Ipsos uses fixed sample targets, unique to each study, in drawing sample. After a sample has been obtained from the Ipsos panel, Ipsos calibrates respondent characteristics to be representative of the U.S. Population using standard procedures such as raking-ratio adjustments. The source of these population targets is U.S. Census 2016 American Community Survey data. The sample drawn for this study reflects fixed sample targets on demographics. Post-hoc weights were made to the population characteristics on gender, age, region, race/ethnicity and income.

    Statistical margins of error are not applicable to online nonprobability sampling polls. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error and measurement error. Where figures do not sum to 100, this is due to the effects of rounding. Ipsos calculates a design effect (DEFF) for each study based on the variation of the weights, following the formula of Kish (1965). This study had a credibility interval adjusted for design effect of the following (n=2,010, DEFF=1.5, adjusted Confidence Interval=4.0).

    For more information about conducting research intended for public release or Ipsos’ online polling methodology, please visit our Public Opinion Polling and Communication page where you can download our brochure, see our public release protocol, or contact us.

    For more information on this news release, please contact:

    Chris Jackson
    Vice President, U.S.
    Ipsos Public Affairs
    +1 202 420-2025
    chris.jackson@ipsos.com

    Marie-Pierre Lemay
    Senior Account Manager, U.S.
    Ipsos Public Affairs
    +1 613 793-1622
    marie.lemay@ipsos.com

    About Ipsos

    Ipsos is an independent market research company controlled and managed by research professionals. Founded in France in 1975, Ipsos has grown into a worldwide research group with a strong presence in all key markets. Ipsos ranks fourth in the global research industry.

    With offices in 89 countries, Ipsos delivers insightful expertise across five research specializations: brand, advertising and media; customer loyalty; marketing; public affairs research; and survey management.
    Ipsos researchers assess market potential and interpret market trends. They develop and build brands. They help clients build long-term relationships with their customers. They test advertising and study audience responses to various media and they measure public opinion around the globe.
    Ipsos has been listed on the Paris Stock Exchange since 1999 and generated global revenues of €1,780.5 million in 2017.

    However, Two Thirds Believe that Print Will Eventually be Phased-Out and Digital Will Rule
    Business Contact
  • Ipsos Global Advisor: Views on Aging

    older woman looking into a mirror

    Nicolas Boyon

    Nicolas
    Boyon
    Senior Vice President, US, Public Affairs
    This contact is NOT an Expert

    Chris Jackson

    Chris
    Jackson
    Vice President, US, Public Affairs
    This contact is NOT an Expert

    Emily Chen

    Emily
    Chen
    Research Analyst, Public Affairs
    This contact is NOT an Expert
    Society
    Retirement
    Public opinion
    Culture
    older woman looking into a mirror
    Society

    Washington D.C., February 12, 2019 — Ipsos MORI’s exclusive study, conducted in partnership with the Centre for Aging Better, a UK charity, funded by an endowment from The National Lottery Community Fund, shows the negativity felt by the online public across 30 countries about aging, and how they are preparing for later life.

    Sentiments in the U.S.

    Overall, working age Americans (18-64) fall slightly above the global average in optimism about aging (40%) and are right in line with the average in what age is considered to be old (66 years). In the U.S., two-fifths of the population under the age of 50 (40%) consider someone old if they are between 60-69 years of age while only a fourth of the population of those between 50-64 (26%) believe the same. Older age groups are more likely to believe old age happens later; only 20% of those who are under 35 consider 70-79 to be old, while 43% of those who are 50-64 believe the same.

    Working age Americans are rather optimistic when it comes to preparedness for aging. Three-quarters think it is possible to prepare for old age (75%), which is more than 10-points above the global total (64%). Furthermore, a significantly smaller portion than the rest of the world said they worry about getting old (48%, versus 52% globally).

    The older working age Americans get, the more they prioritize spending time with loved ones and de-emphasize work. About a third of those under 35 (35%) say having more time to spend with friends/family is the best thing about growing old, but this number rises to 39% for those between 35-49 and 41% for those who are between 50-64. Similarly, the sentiment that giving up work is also something to look forward to increases in importance with age (15% of those who are under 35, 17% of those who are between 35-49, and 19% of those who are between 50-64 share this belief).

    Similar to global statistics, working age Americans are the most worried about not having enough money to live on when thinking about getting old (14%). However, this is largely a fear that comes with age as almost twice as many of those who are over 35 (17%) than those who are under (9%) share this sentiment. Younger people are the most worried about losing their memory (15%), losing family or friends through death (12%), and being lonely (10%), while older people are most worried about not having enough money (17%), being unable to do things they once could (15%), and losing mobility (13%).The U.S. has one of the highest proportion of people who believe there is a lack of respect toward the elderly. A vast majority of Americans believe that people don’t respect old people as much as they should (72%), which is much greater than the global average (60%).

    Among 29 countries, the U.S. falls on the lower end of the spectrum when it comes to political clout of the elderly – only 22% agree that old people have too much political influence. However, younger people are far more likely than older people to believe this sentiment. More than one-third of those under 35 (36%) agree that old people have too much political influence, compared to a fifth of those between 35-49 (19%) and fewer than 1 in 10 of those aged 50-64 (9%).

    Global Findings

    Optimism about later life

    Globally, just one in three (33%) are looking forward to old age. Americans fall slightly above the global average at 40%. Other countries feel much more positive about old age, including three quarters (73%) in India and two thirds (67%) in Turkey.

    While people around the world recognize that there are positives to getting old, including having more time to spend with friends and family (36%), more time for hobbies and leisure (32%), more time for holidays and travel (26%) and giving up work (26%) they also identify a number of downsides. Globally, three in ten worry about not having enough to live on (30%) with a quarter worrying about losing mobility (26%) and losing memory (24%).

    Despite this, a majority of us expect to be fit and healthy in old age (57%). In the U.S., only 45% agree with this sentiment. There is also considerable variation between other surveyed countries. Nine in ten of those in Colombia, Argentina, China, Peru and Malaysia (89%, 88%, 88%, 86% and 85% respectively) agree with this sentiment. In comparison, those least likely to agree are those in South Korea (17%), France (20%) Japan (23%) and Belgium (24%).

    Taken together though, this results in high levels of concern about later life. Globally, half (52%) of us worry about old age with people in Brazil and China (72% and 71% respectively) most likely to agree with this. Those in South Korea are least concerned; only one in six (16%) agree that they worry about old age.

    When is old age, and what does it mean?

    Globally, we think old age begins at 66. The biggest determinant of what someone thinks of as being old is their own age; the older people get, the more likely they are to define ‘old’ as being something that happens later in life. To illustrate, those who are 16-24 believe old age begins at 61. This rises to 72 for those aged between 55-64. Variation in countries is also significant; in Spain, you will only be considered old at age 74, whereas in Saudi Arabia and Malaysia, old age comes decades earlier (55 and 56 respectively). When asked to select words to describe old age, the most commonly mentioned term is wise (35%). Next in line is frail (32%), followed by lonely (30%) and only a quarter saying respected (25%).

    Three in five (60%) agree that people don’t respect old people as much as they should. Agreement with this sentiment is highest in the LATAM countries (Brazil – 821%, Colombia – 79%, Argentina – 76%, Chile – 75%). At the other end of the spectrum, only a quarter (26%) of those in Saudi Arabia agree with this, and a third (32%) of those in Japan.

    Representation in the media

    Opinion is polarized on how old people are depicted in the media. Only three in ten (31%) think that TV, film and advertising make old age seem exciting and full of potential while roughly the same proportion (29%) think that TV, film and advertising make old age seem depressing, with limited opportunities.

    Americans are evenly split on this issue – roughly the same amount think that media makes old age seem depressing (26%) and exciting (28%).

    Countries most positive about the representation of older people in the media include China (52%), Russia (44%) and India (43%).

    In Turkey nearly half (48%) think that TV, film and advertising make old age seem depressing, with limited opportunities. Some LATAM countries are also negative on this issue – in Chile, Mexico, and Peru roughly two in five (39%, 39% and 38% respectively) and over a third (36%) in Colombia think this.

    Political power

    Globally, only three in ten (29%) agree that old people have too much influence, politically. On balance, people disagree with this sentiment (35%). However, there are some differences by age, with younger people more likely to think that old people do have too much influence politically. For instance, two in five (38%) of those aged 16-24 agree while only a quarter (27%) disagree.

    People in Romania are most likely to agree that old people have too much influence (45%), followed by Malaysia (44%) and Japan (42%). Least likely to agree are those in Australia (17%), Russia (18%) and Belgium and Sweden (both 19%).

    The potential for technology

    Globally, we are techno-optimists; over half (55%) agree that technological developments will improve old age for a lot of people. Only one in seven (14%) disagree.

    There are, however, significant differences in agreement by country. Four in five (80%) people in China agree that technological developments will improve old age for a lot of people. The next most positive countries are Brazil (66%), Turkey and Argentina (both 65%).

    People in Japan are least convinced about the potential for technological developments to improve old age for a lot of people. Here, only two in five (41%) agree with this statement. People in Belgium and France are similarly cautious (44% agree in each country).

    Preparing for later life

    Around the world, two thirds (64%) think that it is possible for people to prepare for old age so that they are healthier and better able to cope.

    People in some LATAM countries seem to have most faith in their ability to prepare for old age; in Mexico, Colombia and Brazil, four in five agree that people are able to prepare for old age (83%, 80% and 79% respectively). Four in five in China (79%) also agree with this.People in Russia (57%), the Czech Republic (51%) and South Korea (49%) feel least able to prepare for old age. Globally, people have a clear idea of what we should be doing to prepare for later life. The most commonly mentioned responses are staying healthy by exercising regularly and eating a healthy diet (60% and 59% respectively). Saving enough money for an adequate pension is mentioned by half (51%) and avoiding smoking, having a good circle of friends, and having a sport or hobby they practice regularly are cited by over two in five (45%, 44% and 44% respectively).

    However, there is a gap between what we know we should do to prepare for old age, and what we are doing. When asked what people are doing in order to prepare for old age the most popular answer globally is avoiding smoking, mentioned by over two in five (45%). A similar proportion also mention eating a healthy diet and avoiding too much alcohol (43% and 40% respectively). Under three in ten (28%) mention saving enough money for an adequate pension.

    About the Study

    These are findings of the Global Advisor survey conducted between 24 August and 7 September 2018. Interviews were conducted using the Ipsos Online Panel system, Global Advisor, among 20,788 online adults aged 16-64 in 28 countries (Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, China, Colombia, the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, India, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, Poland, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden and Turkey) and 18-64 in U.S. and Canada.

    Approximately 1000+ individuals participated on a country by country basis via the Ipsos Online Panel, with the exception of Argentina, Belgium, Chile, Hungary, Mexico, Peru, Poland, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden and Turkey, where each have a sample approximately 500+.

    Weighting was then employed to balance demographics and ensure that the sample's composition reflects that of the general adult population according to the most recent country Census data, and to provide results intended to approximate the sample universe. A survey with an unweighted probability sample of this size and a 100% response rate would have an estimated margin of error of +/-3.1 percentage points for a sample of 1,000 and an estimated margin of error of +/- 4.5 percentage points 19 times out of 20 per country of what the results would have been had the entire population of adults in that country had been polled. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error, and measurement error.

    15 of the 30 countries surveyed online generate nationally representative samples in their countries (Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, United Kingdom, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Poland, South Korea, Spain, Sweden and United States).

    Brazil, Colombia, China, Chile, Czech Republic, India, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, South Africa and Turkey produce a national sample that is more urban & educated, and with higher incomes than their fellow citizens. We refer to these respondents as “Upper Deck Consumer Citizens”. They are not nationally representative of their country.

    Where results do not sum to 100, this may be due to computer rounding, multiple responses or the exclusion of don't knows or not stated responses.

    Additional information can be found here: Views on Aging

    For more information on this news release please contact:

    Nicolas Boyon
    Senior Vice President, U.S.
    Public Affairs
    212.293.6544
    Nicolas.Boyon@ipsos.com

    Ipsos global study finds high levels of concern about aging and paints a worried picture of later life.
    Business Contact
  • Market Research Council Luncheon

    market research luncheon cover
    New Services
    Ipsos’ behavioral scientist, Jesse Itzkowitz, is delighted to be sharing his insight into How Behavioral Economics Is Changing Marketing and Marketing Research.
    22 Feb 2019
    New York City, NY

    Ipsos’ behavioral scientist, Jesse Itzkowitz, is delighted to be sharing his insight into How Behavioral Economics Is Changing Marketing and Marketing Research.

    Consumer economics has always been one of the pillars of marketing and marketing research, but economics assumes consumers are rational beings. Behavioral economics has re-framed the study of consumer behavior recognizing that we are emotional beings. This changes everything!

    How should brands consider behavioral economics in their positioning, advertising, pricing and promotion? How should research frame questions to get realistic answers? How should data scientists interpret Web behaviors to really understand consumer engagement?

    On February 22, Jesse and his co-presenters will share three case-study presentations, followed by a salon-style discussion.

    For more information, please visit the MRC website.

    Topic
    Consumer Behavior
    Marketing
    Geographical Area
    Business Contact
  • [WEBINAR] The Future Is Visual: Incorporating Observation into Research

    research cover
    New Services
    In market research there is an assumption that if we ask the right questions, we’ll get some answers, and this will be sufficient to answer our clients business questions.
    20 Mar 2019
    10:30amPT / 1:30pmET
    Online

    In market research there is an assumption that if we ask the right questions, we’ll get some answers, and this will be sufficient to answer our business questions. But simply looking at stated behavior neglects a very important layer of data we use every day, something the research world is slow to catch-up on. Visual data, the things we see people doing, the environments they live in, the interactions between people and groups.

    Join us for a complimentary webinar covering the power of observation, how to observe in context with research, and steps to analyze and make meaning from visual data.

    Space is limited. Register today.

    Topic
    Online Research
    Geographical Area
  • [WEBINAR] The Future of Perennials and Connected Health/Wellness

    perennials
    New Services
    With life expectancy rising and birth rates falling, Perennials are poised to become an even greater force in the future.
    27 Mar 2019
    10:30 am ET / 4:30 pm CT
    Online

    Dispelling myths about aging and technology

    With life expectancy rising and birth rates falling, Perennials are poised to become an even greater force in the future. While we need to decide how to care for those who need it, this over-65 age group is increasingly living life to the fullest. Instead of slowing down, they're taking on new challenges, roles and responsibilities. While they are not digital natives, they are more connected than we give them credit for. They're not withdrawing from life, but are demanding more – from life, marketers and policymakers. They are Perennials, and we need to change our attitudes towards them and gain a greater understanding of the opportunities they present.

    Join us for a complimentary webinar featuring Ipsos' Global Head of Connected Health and HP's Head of Population Health Worldwide who will walk you through their insights into the future of health and aging, and the role technology will play in transforming tomorrow's health and wellness industry.

    To dispel myths about today's aging society and its use of technology, we will explore:

    • Insights into current perceptions of aging
    • Challenges and opportunities for the healthcare industry
    • Examples and case studies demonstrating how connected health is transforming healthcare access and experience for the aging population

    Some key takeaways

    You will discover the potential for change brought about by technology and the capacity it has for revolutionizing how care for the elderly is delivered and how it can change the way this aging society is experiencing life. You'll see further demonstrations of how connected health and Perennials intersect, including examples from HP of innovative inroads for aging, such as the future of robotics, VR and remote monitoring to transform healthcare. By understanding the connection between healthcare and technology for Perennials, you can chart a path to success in your health and wellness business.

    If you can't attend live, please register to receive the recording.

    Register Now →

    In the event you will be attending the upcoming global gatherings at eyeforpharma Barcelona (March 12-14) or eyeforpharma Philadelphia (April 16-17), we would be delighted to meet up with you there. Come visit our team onsite, or RSVP to join us for dinner.

    Topic
    Healthcare
    Geographical Area
    Business Contact
  • Most Americans Working Full-Time Report Feeling Stressed at Work

    Stressed worker

    Chris Jackson

    Chris
    Jackson
    Vice President, US, Public Affairs
    This contact is NOT an Expert
    Employees
    Employee Engagement
    Stressed worker
    Society

    Washington, DC, February 12, 2019 — According to a recent Ipsos poll conducted on behalf of Welltok, working Americans feel stressed about work and want employer support in their efforts to improve or maintain their personal wellbeing. Sixty-four percent of employed Americans say they feel stressed at work. A third (33%, strongly agree/agree) say that work stress is negatively impacting their life and a similar proportion (35%) have seriously considered changing their work situation due to stress. Even though 65% of employed Americans say they believe companies should be responsible for helping their employees manage or reduce workplace stress, only a third (33%) say that their employer offers them tools and resources to help them reduce work stress.

    Full time workers say it is personally important to them that their employer offers programs and resources that support emotional health (63%), financial health (63%), and physical health (63%). Employed Americans are less likely to want social connectedness support from their employers (48%). Nearly seven in ten (69%) report that over the past couple of years they have increased their use of technology to manage or support their health.

    Almost six in ten (58%) full-time working Americans say they feel their direct manager supports their efforts to improve or maintain their health and wellbeing; while 42% feel otherwise. However, only 16% strongly agree that they know where to find all the health and wellbeing resources their employer offers. When it comes to ways that companies can help motivate employers to complete health-related activities, extra vacation time (74%), flexible work schedule (62%), and wellness benefits (55%) are the most popular non-traditional choices. Discounts on local activities and goods (50%), raffles for large gifts (45%), sporting events (35%) and lottery tickets (33%) are also ways to motivate employees to complete activities that promotes healthy habits.

    Just over eight in ten (82%) strongly agree/agree/somewhat agree that if their employer offered more relevant health and wellbeing programs, they would participate more. However, more than eight in ten (84%) say they feel that everyone at their company gets offered the same health and wellbeing resources and 56% report that their employer has offered health and wellbeing resources that are not relevant to them.

    Looking forward to 2019, 55% of employed Americans state that financial stability is their top health and wellbeing priority of 2019. Other popular priorities include healthy eating habits (46%), positive work and family relationships (41%), appropriate level of physical activity (40%), and adequate sleep (36%). Working Americans also want manageable stress levels (26%), control over existing health conditions (17%), and to find a higher purpose (13%).

    About the Study

    These are the findings from an Ipsos poll conducted December 18 - 20, 2018 on behalf of Welltok. For the survey, a sample of 1,097 adults ages 21 and over from the continental U.S., Alaska and Hawaii was interviewed online, in English. In order to qualify for the survey, adults must be working full time. The precision of Ipsos online polls is measured using a credibility interval. In this case, the poll has a credibility interval of ±3.4 percentage points for all respondents.

    The sample for this study was randomly drawn from Ipsos’s online panel (see link below for more info on “Access Panels and Recruitment”), partner online panel sources, and “river” sampling (see link below for more info on the Ipsos “Ampario Overview” sample method) and does not rely on a population frame in the traditional sense. Ipsos uses fixed sample targets, unique to each study, in drawing sample. After a sample has been obtained from the Ipsos panel, Ipsos calibrates respondent characteristics to be representative of the U.S. Population using standard procedures such as raking-ratio adjustments. The source of these population targets is U.S. Census 2016 American Community Survey data. The sample drawn for this study reflects fixed sample targets on demographics. Post-hoc weights were made to the population characteristics on gender, age, and region.

    Statistical margins of error are not applicable to online nonprobability sampling polls. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error and measurement error. Where figures do not sum to 100, this is due to the effects of rounding. Ipsos calculates a design effect (DEFF) for each study based on the variation of the weights, following the formula of Kish (1965). This study had a credibility interval adjusted for design effect of the following (n=1,097, DEFF=1.5, adjusted Confidence Interval=4.9).

    For more information about conducting research intended for public release or Ipsos’ online polling methodology, please visit our Public Opinion Polling and Communication page where you can download our brochure, see our public release protocol, or contact us.

    For more information on this news release, please contact:

    Chris Jackson
    Vice President, U.S.
    Ipsos Public Affairs
    +1 202 420-2025
    chris.jackson@ipsos.com

    Marie-Pierre Lemay
    Senior Account Manager, U.S.
    Ipsos Public Affairs
    +1 613 793-1622
    marie.lemay@ipsos.com

    About Ipsos

    Ipsos is an independent market research company controlled and managed by research professionals. Founded in France in 1975, Ipsos has grown into a worldwide research group with a strong presence in all key markets. Ipsos ranks fourth in the global research industry.
    With offices in 89 countries, Ipsos delivers insightful expertise across five research specializations: brand, advertising and media; customer loyalty; marketing; public affairs research; and survey management.
    Ipsos researchers assess market potential and interpret market trends. They develop and build brands. They help clients build long-term relationships with their customers. They test advertising and study audience responses to various media and they measure public opinion around the globe.
    Ipsos has been listed on the Paris Stock Exchange since 1999 and generated global revenues of €1,780.5 million in 2017.

     

    Two-thirds Believe Companies Should Be Responsible for Helping Their Employees Manage and Reduce Workplace Stress
    Business Contact