Flair Brazil 2017 Debris or Seeds?

Currently, Brazil’s situation is hectic. And, this is not the first time that the country faces a difficult situation like this. Some could say this country is definitely condemned to live like in a rollercoaster. But, this time, it may be different. And it is our bet: the current political, economic and moral crisis can awake a new conscience and trigger a real transition.

Flair Brazil 2017 Debris or Seeds?

The author(s)

  • Alexandre De Saint-Léon Ipsos, Brazil
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1. Brazil is in a challenging situation. 

This is not the first time that Brazil has faced a difficult situation like this. Some could say this country is definitely condemned to live like a rollercoaster. But this time, it may be different. And this is our bet: the current political, economic and moral crisis can awaken a new conscience and trigger a real transition. It is a time when wise choices are imperative. 

 

2. Brazil is on the wrong track according to 87% of population.

Consumer confidence in the economy is low and there is a self-esteem crisis never seen before: 20% claim not to be proud to be Brazilian.

 

3. Brazil trades down products and services without giving up some small pleasures. 

The self-indulgence remains strong in this period of economic crisis, but in a more conscious way and not as ostentatious as it was before. “Premium consumption” has become the “satisfaction of small indulgences of everyday life”.

 

4. Brazil’s sharing economy is growing. 

This means lower prices, additional income, environmentally friendly opportunities, innovation and a new consumer’s philosophy of life (experience/use is more important than acquisition). The sharing economy competes against and affects the status quo of traditional companies, representing new challenges. 

 

5. Brazil hasn’t lost its sense of humour. 

Humour becomes one of the weapons to deal with the economic, political and moral crisis the country is experiencing. Prime time speeches or ads, full of emotional content but lacking truth, are no longer relevant because they are not credible.

 

6. Brazil is more demanding. 

Citizens/consumers are looking for information – especially in social media – and complaining more often. In the meantime, the diversity of market players has increased and options considered as “different” have been gaining space. Authenticity is the key now.

 

7. Brazil is ageing. 

In 30 years, the population above 65 years of age will be larger than the population under 15 years, which will result in real social, political and economic transformation of society. Brands and companies have not yet taken the seniors’ potential for consumption into consideration.

 

8. Brazil is boosting connections. 

Almost two-thirds (62%) of Brazilians have Internet access, accounting for a 106% increase when compared to 2006. Brazil is Facebook’s second largest user database and the largest online social interaction platform with over 99 million users. Brazilian trending topics often lead Twitter’s global ranking of references.

 

9. Brazil is opening space to discuss new activisms. 

Even though the country is still very conservative, discussions about gender have become an important topic and activist movements are not only happening in the university sphere as they used to be. Some brands are also beginning to explore new possibilities to communicate with LGBT and other segments of the population.  

 

10. Brazil is experiencing a new wave of feminism.

Online feminist campaigns and manifestations have gained strength since 2014, when the #IDoNotDeserveToBeRaped campaign began as a response to the results of IPEA’s survey on Social Tolerance to Violence against Women. It is crucial for brands to understand who these “new” women really are, to integrate them in their communication and in their corporate practices.

 

Ipsos Flair Brazil 2017
The Escadaria Selarón (Selaron Steps) is one of the main tourist attractions of Rio de Janeiro. Jorge Selarón, plastic artist, has covered a staircase with pieces of tile, mirror and ceramics. His ambition: to transform a miserable lane thanks to debris, recycled or offered by visitors.

The author(s)

  • Alexandre De Saint-Léon Ipsos, Brazil

Society