Anti-Social Behaviour

This report is the first to map how anti-social behaviour is perceived at a local level across all parts of England and how these views are changing over time. Tailored analysis enables us to identify where perceptions are not as we might expect; in some areas perceptions of anti-social behaviour are better than we would predict, in others they are worse.

This report is the first to map how anti-social behaviour is perceived at a local level across all parts of England and how these views are changing over time. Tailored analysis enables us to identify where perceptions are not as we might expect; in some areas perceptions of anti-social behaviour are better than we would predict, in others they are worse. This report comes at a critical point. The appraisals of Tony Blair’s 10 years of power have been quick to label his term as a success or failure across different key areas of policy. However, when it comes to one of his personal priorities, the tackling of anti-social behaviour and instilling of a “proper sense of respect” in our communities, the commentators have been notably non-committal. So, do we believe that the neighbourhoods of Britain in 2007 are more respectful and more law-abiding than those 10 years ago? Has the outgoing Prime Minister fulfilled his ambition to “bring back a proper sense of respect in our schools, in our communities, in our towns and our villages?” or has it, in the words of David Cameron, merely been a case of “New Labour nannying”.

Well, anxieties and fears around anti-social behaviour have certainly not disappeared but at the same time there are indications that we are now less concerned than we were. Is it simply too complex an issue to fully comprehend, let alone resolve, or is it something that we don’t like to admit is actually getting better?

Whatever the answers, whilst it continues to top local issues of concern – and it does – how best to deal with anti-social behaviour remains a key battle ground for the main political parties.

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