The Complexity of Patients with NSCLC with Brain Metastases Presents Significant Challenges for Oncologists

Little data exists currently to understand the challenges and needs for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients whose disease has metastasised to the brain. The European Cancer Organisation (ECO) representing 31 Member Societies and a Patient Advisory Committee comprising of 20 European patient groups commissioned research with Ipsos MORI to share findings on this subject at their Roundtable event in October 2021.

The author(s)

  • Jemma Reast Healthcare, UK
  • Emma Middleton Healthcare, UK
  • Alina Finagina Healthcare, UK
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Little data exists currently to understand the challenges and needs for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients whose disease has metastasised to the brain. The European Cancer Organisation (ECO) representing 31 Member Societies and a Patient Advisory Committee comprising of 20 European patient groups commissioned research with Ipsos MORI to share findings on this subject at their Roundtable event in October 2021.

The market research study, which took place in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the UK and the US, demonstrated some of the challenges and complexity surrounding the management of NSCLC patients with brain metastases. 350 Oncologists or Respiratory Specialists chose to take part in the study conducted by Ipsos, on behalf of The Sanofi and Regeneron Alliance, GCI Healthcare and the European Cancer Organisation.

Highlights from this survey included:

  • Patients suffer from a broad set array of symptoms linked to both their NSCLC and brain metastasis, leading to physical and psychological deterioration.
  • Cancer symptoms are compounded by brain mets symptoms affecting coordination, speech, memory loss and confusion
    • According to the HCPs surveyed, 40 percent (on average) of NSCLC patients with brain mets experience headaches caused by brain swelling
    • Around a third of patients experience some or multiple elements of the following debilitating effects of their comorbid cancer diagnosis: decreases in memory, attention, and reasoning (34%), unsteadiness and coordination problems (31%) and confusion (30%).
  • The disease burden includes many physical and cognitive challenges faced by patients and emotional distress, which can be more challenging to manage.
     

The author(s)

  • Jemma Reast Healthcare, UK
  • Emma Middleton Healthcare, UK
  • Alina Finagina Healthcare, UK

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