Decline in trust sparks call to action for Scottish third sector

Measuring public trust in charities on behalf of the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO).

Decline in trust sparks call to action for Scottish third sector

The author(s)

  • Emily Gray Ipsos MORI Scotland
  • Lucy Setterfield Ipsos MORI Scotland
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In December 2017 Ipsos MORI conducted a survey of the Scottish public on behalf of the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO), focusing on trust in charities. SCVO said: 

73% of the 1,088 Scots questioned strongly or tended to agree that 'most charities are trustworthy and act in the public interest' - a drop from 82% in 2015. However, the rate of trust recorded in Scotland is still substantially higher when compared to England and Wales.
Personal experience was a key indicator of trust in charities. When asked about the charities whose services they had used, respondents were more positive. A total of 77% of those questioned rated their trust and confidence as six or above out of 10 for charities whose services they had used and 59% gave high scores of eight and above.
The survey also showed the effect that negative media coverage can have on charities. More than a third of those questioned (38%) said that recent stories had made them lose confidence in charities, compared to 21% who said recent personal experiences had made them lose confidence.
The findings have prompted the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO) to launch an ‘I Love Charity’ campaign, which aims to support good governance within organisations to ensure they are well run and transparent, to encourage charities to work harder at promoting the impact of their work, and to dispel myths or misunderstandings about charities.

Technical note

The Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations commissioned independent researchers Ipsos MORI to conduct a survey of 1,088 respondents aged 16+ in Scotland using computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI). Participants were selected for interview at random using random digit dialling. Fieldwork took place between 27th November and 5th December 2017.

Data are weighted by: age, sex and working status using census data; tenure using Scottish Household Survey data; and public-private sector employment using Scottish Government Quarterly Public Sector Employment series data.

Where results do not sum to 100%, this may be due to computer rounding, multiple responses, or the exclusion of “don’t know” categories. Results are based on all respondents (1,088) unless otherwise stated.

 

The author(s)

  • Emily Gray Ipsos MORI Scotland
  • Lucy Setterfield Ipsos MORI Scotland

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