Ipsos MORI Political Monitor October 2008

Ipsos MORI's October Political Monitor shows that despite media speculation about a "bailout bounce", the Conservatives remain firmly in the lead with more than four in ten voters choosing them (45%), while Labour trails on 30%.

Ipsos MORI Political Monitor October 2008

Ipsos MORI's October Political Monitor (carried out by telephone between 17-19 October 2008 among 1,004 adults age 18 and over) shows that160despite media speculation about a "bailout bounce", the Conservatives remain firmly in the lead with more than four in ten voters choosing them (45%), while Labour trails on 30%. Brown's personal ratings have increased by 11 points. While the majority (59%, down from 69% last month) remain dissatisfied with Brown it appears that his actions over the last month have improved his image with the public. However, far more people remain satisfied than dissatisfied with David Cameron; he is still well ahead of Brown in his personal ratings.

Economic gloom has lifted somewhat with the bailout bounce,160although the overall balance remains pessimistic: the proportion of those who feel the economic condition of the country will improve in the next twelve months has doubled, from 12% to 24%, the highest optimism score measured since April 2002. In addition, the proportion of those who think the economy will get worse has dropped from seven in ten (70%) in September to six in ten (59%) now. The Economic Optimism Index (those who think it will get better minus those who think it will get worse) has moved from an all-time high of -58 last month to -35 now.

Although the Brown/Darling team is more trusted in the current economic crisis than the Cameron/Osborne team (45% vs. 34%), the Labour team was more highly trusted this time last year, when 61% preferred Brown/Darling and just 22% Cameron/Osborne. Despite the Labour team's lead on this issue, and Brown's improved personal ratings, 53% disagree that Gordon Brown's response to the current economic crisis shows that he is a true world leader (and 41% agree).

More than two in five (43%) full-time workers are concerned about the possibility of being made redundant or becoming unemployed over the next 12 months, although just over half (55%) are not concerned.160

Download the October Political Monitor Download the October Trends Download the October Tables

More insights about Public Sector

Society