Management of the NHS

A new Ipsos MORI survey for British Medical Association has shown that two in three (66%) of those in GB aged 15+ are in favour of doctors having a greater say in how the NHS is run.

Management of the NHS

A new Ipsos MORI survey for British Medical Association has shown that two in three (66%) of those in GB aged 15+ are in favour of doctors having a greater say in how the NHS is run, while 73% believe policies about the NHS from political parties are designed to win votes, not to do what is best for the NHS.

The research also found that just over half of people (55%) believe it is doctors, rather than NHS managers (34%) or politicians (11%), should be involved in the decisions about how the NHS is run.

Carried out using the Ipsos MORI Omnibus, the new research also found that 65% agree that the NHS should manage itself, without the involvement of politicians, as it understands how best to provide healthcare, whilst only 33% agree that Parliament should set overall targets for the NHS to achieve.

Technical Note

  • The research was conducted on Capibus, Ipsos MORI’s face to face omnibus, between 6th June – 12th June 2014
  • Questions were asked offline to an unweighted base of 1970 adults aged 15+ across Great Britain.
  • Data have been weighted to the known population profile
  • Full data tables are available upon request.
  • Where percentages do not add up to 100, this may be due to computer rounding, multiple responses, or the exclusion of don’t know categories.
  • All figures are percentages based on the total sample 1970 unless otherwise stated.

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