MEPs Push for Single Currency in 1999

Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) are keen to press ahead with the single currency according to MORI's annual survey of MEPs. This is in contrast to the British public who are increasingly uncertain about the single currency (MORI poll for the Times Newspaper, 17 April).

Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) are keen to press ahead with the single currency according to MORI's annual survey of MEPs. This is in contrast to the British public who are increasingly uncertain about the single currency (MORI poll for the Times Newspaper, 17 April).

The principle of a single currency is supported by the majority of MEPs (72%), with 61% strongly in favour.

MEPs are also now more optimistic about the likelihood of the single currency being adopted by at least a minority of states in 1999 than they were a year ago. Three-quarters (75%) think this will happen, compared with 55% in 1996.

While 36% of MEPs think it likely that Britain will meet the present convergence criteria for monetary union to begin in 1999, only one in ten actually think Britain will join at this time. Germany, France and Luxembourg are thought most likely to both meet the criteria and join.

Q Which member state do you consider likely to meet the present convergence criteria for monetary union to begin in 1999?

 %
Luxembourg88
Germany71
France69
Netherlands68
Austria50
Ireland45
Belgium42
Denmark40
Finland36
United kingdom36
Sweden24
Spain22
Italy12
Portugal7
Greece0

Base: All MPs [117]

Q Which states do you think will join a single currency in 1999?

 %
Luxembourg75
Germany75
France75
Netherlands69
Austria56
Belgium63
Ireland38
Spain35
Finland34
Italy29
Denmark26
Sweden22
Portugal14
United kingdom10
Greece5

Base: All MPs [117]

Technical details

The survey among 117 MEPs was conducted between 17 February and 14 March 1997.

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