Public Attitudes Towards Adult Entertainment

In 2005, a working group on adult entertainment was set up by Scottish Ministers to review the scope and impact of adult entertainment activity.

Public Attitudes Towards Adult Entertainment

In 2005, a working group on adult entertainment was set up by Scottish Ministers to review the scope and impact of adult entertainment activity.

Ipsos MORI was commissioned to examine the public's attitudes towards adult entertainment, the use of these services, the perceived social impact of such activities and opinions on the licensing of adult entertainment venues.

Key findings:

  1. A third of the people asked said they had been to an adult entertainment venue at some time. Men were more likely to have been than women.
  2. The main circumstances around visiting an adult entertainment venue were being on a stag night or hen night, being on some other organised night out and being on holiday.
  3. There was strong support for specific licences for adult entertainment venues.
  4. Regulations that people would be most likely to support mainly involved restrictions on where and how venues operate rather than an outright ban.

The full report and a summary of the research findings can be obtained at: www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2006/04/24111914/5

Technical details

A module of 11 questions was placed on the Ipsos MORI Scottish Social Policy Monitor. This is a multi-client, quarterly survey designed for organisations to collect regular robust data on the characteristics of the Scottish population. The survey is carried out among a representative sample of Scottish adults and is conducted face-to-face in respondents homes using CAPI (Computer Assisted Personal Interviewing).

This wave of the Social Policy Monitor involved interviews with 1,015 adults between 20 August and 2 October 2005. The adult entertainment section of the Social Policy Monitor was completed using computer-assisted self-interviewing, where respondents input their responses to survey questions directly into a hand-held computer. This included an opt-out option for people who felt uncomfortable with the sensitive topic or did not feel confident using a computer. A total of 193 respondents opted out of this section. Of this group, almost two thirds (58%) were aged over 60 years, perhaps indicating that the majority of people who refused are likely to have done so because they were not willing to use the computer.

As a result, 822 of the 1,015 respondents completed this section of the questionnaire. The data were weighted to reflect the age and sex profile of the Scottish population and the geographical distribution across local authorities.

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