Public remain pessimistic about the health of Britain’s economy

The public remain pessimistic about the health of Britain’s economy

Public remain pessimistic about the health of Britain’s economy

The author(s)

  • Gideon Skinner Head of Political Research
  • Glenn Gottfried Ipsos Public Affairs, UK
Get in touch

A majority of Britons (52%) believe that the country’s economy will get worse over the next 12 months, according to the latest Ipsos MORI Political Monitor, little change from the last survey in July when 54% said things would get worse. One in five (21%) say the economy will improve over the next year (an improvement from 14% in July) while a similar number (23%) say it will stay the same (down from 28%). This leaves an Ipsos MORI Economic Optimism Index score (net get better minus get worse) of -31.  This is an improvement of nine points in the Index since July, but remains lower than the average score of -18 in the first five months of the year.

When looking at the differences between various demographics in Britain the figures show women to be more pessimistic than men. Three in five (58%) women say the economy will get worse compared with 47% of men. Younger people are also more pessimistic with three in five (59%) 18-34 year olds saying the economy will get worse while 44% of those aged 55 and over say the same (this number drops to 38% for those aged 65+). Those who own a home outright are also less pessimistic than other tenure types. Forty-four percent say the economy will get worse, compared with half (52%) of those paying a mortgage and three in five (61%) renters. 

Political Monitor EOI

People in the Midlands and the South outside London are less pessimistic than the rest of the country, with 43% and 44% respectively saying the economy will get worse over the next 12 months. This compares with two in three (65%) in the North, 62% in Scotland, and 60% in London.

Gideon Skinner, Head of Political Research at Ipsos MORI, said:

Although economic optimism has improved slightly since July, overall Britons remain pessimistic.  In line with other research, there is a clear generational divide, with younger people much more pessimistic than older people.

Technical note

Ipsos MORI interviewed a representative sample of 1,023 adults aged 18+ across Great Britain. Interviews were conducted by telephone 15th – 18th September 2017.  Data are weighted to the profile of the population.

The author(s)

  • Gideon Skinner Head of Political Research
  • Glenn Gottfried Ipsos Public Affairs, UK

More insights about Public Sector

Society