The public will consider many alternatives to driving - if conditions are right

The national survey, sponsored by Railtrack, RAC, Confederation of Passenger Transport, BAA, Sustrans and the Pedestrians' Association, canvassed people's opinions on the current network and asked their views on improvements. The poll demonstrated that there is a widespread willingness to switch journeys from the car to other modes of transport - such as trains, buses, and walking if their convenience, safety and reliability can be improved. There is also widespread support for investing in better public transport systems and for improving the integration of different modes.

The national survey, sponsored by Railtrack, RAC, Confederation of Passenger Transport, BAA, Sustrans and the Pedestrians' Association, canvassed people's opinions on the current network and asked their views on improvements. The poll demonstrated that there is a widespread willingness to switch journeys from the car to other modes of transport - such as trains, buses, and walking if their convenience, safety and reliability can be improved. There is also widespread support for investing in better public transport systems and for improving the integration of different modes.

Report Highlights

  • 83% of the public believe the Government should encourage people to use public transport more.
  • 39% of car drivers said they would be prepared to pay more for motoring if the money was spent on public transport.
  • Nine out of 10 people support improved conditions for pedestrians, with eight out of 10 supporting more cycle routes.
  • 84% of the population support the Government having a policy of achieving a more integrated transport system.
  • Around three quarters of the public support moving more freight from road to rail, even if it increased supermarket prices by 1p in the pound.

Generally, the report suggests that the policies required to move people from cars to other modes of transport need to combine carrots and sticks, although it revealed that policies imposing direct costs onto the road user, e.g. doubling the price of petrol, were unanimously opposed.

Technical details

MORI interviewed a representative quota sample of 1,405 adults aged 16 plus across 133 constituency sampling points in Great Britain. All interviews were conducted face-to-face between January 26 and February 13, 1998.

More insights about Travel, Tourism & Transport