Research Methods Centre Update: November 2018

The latest Ipsos Research Methods Centre newsletter features our thinking on push to web survey design, whether it is time to think again about response rates, sampling issues for special populations, and more.

Research Methods Centre Update: November 2018

The author(s)

  • Andrew Cleary Ipsos Research Methods Centre, UK
  • Patten Smith Ipsos Research Methods Centre, UK
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Welcome to the latest edition of the Ipsos Research Methods Centre newsletter. We would like to take this opportunity to share information about our recent methodological work and thinking with researchers and policymakers involved in conducting or commissioning social policy related survey research.

In this edition we feature articles on a range of key themes - our work developing push to web as a methodology for delivering random probability surveys; survey quality and response rates; special sampling issues for rare or hard-to-reach populations; and the use of ‘big data’ in evaluations.

In recent years we have seen push to web emerge as a new methodology to replace traditional face-to-face surveys in developed European markets, and their telephone counterparts in the US. Patten Smith provides an overview of push to web surveys and Ipsos’ latest design thinking. Andrew Cleary outlines findings from a recent push to web pilot across the EU28, the first of its kind, and considers whether the method is viable in a cross-European survey. James Stannard outlines development work undertaken in the UK for the Office for National Statistics (ONS), as they look to move the flagship Labour Force Survey online.

On survey quality more broadly, Patten Smith asks whether it is time to reconsider our fixation with the response rate, presenting a summary of the state of this indicator. Sam Clemens and Scott Jakeways approach this from a different perspective, describing a recent experiment at refusal conversion by offering an online mode as a follow-up to a face-to-face survey.

We then present two articles on special sampling issues. Andrew Cleary evaluates an innovative methodology for sampling rare populations without a sample frame, based on a European survey of minority groups. Sally Horton and Tanja Stojadinovic describe efforts to survey women in conflict-affected areas in Africa, Asia and eastern Europe.

Finally, Raquel de Luis Iglesias gives an overview of several case studies where Ipsos has used ‘big data’, including social intelligence, bibliometric analysis and text analytics, for evaluations.

The author(s)

  • Andrew Cleary Ipsos Research Methods Centre, UK
  • Patten Smith Ipsos Research Methods Centre, UK