Survey on working with the EU to combat the COVID-19 pandemic for The Health Foundation

New survey findings for the Health Foundation finds overwhelming public support for the UK to work with the EU to combat the coronavirus pandemic.

The author(s)

  • Matthew Bristow Public Affairs
  • Kate Duxbury Public Affairs
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The research, conducted on behalf of the Health Foundation by Ipsos MORI as part of a wider survey on people’s experiences during the pandemic, found 77% of people surveyed believe the UK should work ‘very closely’ with the EU to combat COVID-19, with a further 17% agreeing it should work with the EU ‘fairly closely’.

Of those surveyed, almost all of those who voted Remain in the EU Referendum (99%) supported working closely with the EU to combat the pandemic, and over nine in ten (91%) of those who voted Leave also supported closer collaboration.

In addition, the survey indicated public support for an extension to the Brexit transition period to allow the Government to focus on COVID-19, across two sample groups. Among the first sample, who were told that the transition period for leaving the EU would end on 31 December, over half (54%) said the government should request an extension, while 40%  said it should not . Among the second sample, who received additional information on potential delays to the supply of medicines and medicinal products in the event of a no-deal Brexit, in line with government assessments, the proportion thinking the transition period should extend increased to two-thirds (65%), with 31% saying it should not extend. Overall, young people (aged 18-24) were far more likely to advocate an extension (85%).

Technical Note

The survey was conducted by telephone on the Ipsos MORI CATI Omnibus survey, a weekly telephone omnibus survey of a representative sample of people aged 18 and over in Great Britain. Fieldwork took place between 1 and 10 May 2020.  A total of 1,983 people were interviewed. Quotas were set on age, gender, government office region, working status and education attainment. Data has been weighted to the known offline population proportions for age within gender, government office region and working status and social grade.

The author(s)

  • Matthew Bristow Public Affairs
  • Kate Duxbury Public Affairs

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