Global Consumer Confidence is on the Rise

The latest Ipsos Global Consumer Confidence for July 2017 is 48.7.

Global Consumer Confidence is on the Rise

July 2017’s global Primary Index score of 48.7 shows a three-month gain of 1.2 point. The Primary Index reflects attitudes of consumers in 24 countries on the current and future state of local economies, personal finance situation, savings, and confidence to make large investments, as measured monthly by Ipsos Public Affairs.

The Primary Index is up by 1.5 points or more over a three-month period in eight countries, including the United States and Canada. Largest increases are seen in South Korea (+8.1), France (+3.8), and Poland (+3.3). Only South Africa (-3.3) records a notable drop. Countries with the highest Primary Index scores are China (67.1), India (66.3), Sweden (62.1), and the U.S. (61.5). Those with the lowest scores are Italy (37.0), South Africa (38.1), and Brazil (38.6).

Primary Index

These findings are based on data from Thomson Reuters/Ipsos’ Primary Consumer Sentiment Index (PCSI) collected in an ongoing survey of consumers from 24 countries with more than 17,500 interviews conducted each month since 2010.

Subsets of the Primary Index, including the Jobs Index reflecting perceptions of job security, the Expectations Index reflecting economic expectations, and the Investment Index reflecting perceptions of the investment climate, are all up globally.

At 56.3, July 2017’s global Jobs Index score shows a three-month increase of 1.1 point with gains of 1.5 points or more in 12 countries. The largest gains are seen in France (+4.0 points), the U.S. (+3.7) and Turkey (+2.7).  Only South Africa (-2.4) and Great Britain (-1.5) show notable losses. The countries surveyed presenting the largest Jobs Index scores are Sweden (73.2), Germany (70.8), the U.S. (70.0), and China (also 70.0). Countries with the lowest scores are Brazil (30.3), Mexico (42.3), South Africa (44.1), Turkey (44.6), and Russia (45.3).

Jobs Index

 The global Expectations Index score of 57.7 is up 0.7 point over a 3-month period. Gains of 1.5 points or more are recorded in six countries and losses of 1.5 points or more in four countries. The largest increases are seen in South Korea (+10.7), Poland (+3.0), and France (+1.9) and the largest decreases in South Africa (-3.9), Brazil (-2.6), and Argentina (-1.8). India (73.4) and China (71.1) have the highest Expectations Index scores, while South Africa (46.1), Turkey (48.3), and Italy (48.8) have the lowest ones.

Expectations Index

 The global Investment Index shows a 3-month gain of 1.1 point to 42.1. Eight countries record gains of 1.5 points or more with the largest ones in South Korea (+8.3), France (+4.2), and Poland (+3.4). Two countries see their Investment Index drop by 1.5 points or more: South Africa (-4.1) and Israel (-1.8). Countries with the highest Investment Index scores are India (+67.9), China (+64.4), Sweden (+57.1), and the U.S. (+56.4). Those with the lowest scores are Japan (25.7), Italy (27.8), and Hungary (31.4).

Investment Index

These findings are based on data from Thomson Reuters/Ipsos’ Primary Consumer Sentiment Index (PCSI) collected in a monthly survey of consumers from 24 countries via Ipsos’ Global @dvisor online survey platform. For this survey, Ipsos interviews a total of 17,500+ adults aged 18-64 in the United States of America, Canada, and Israel, and age 16-64 in all 21 other countries each month. The monthly sample consists of 1,000+ individuals in each of Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, Great Britain and the USA, and 500+ individuals in each of Argentina, Belgium, Hungary, India, Israel, Mexico, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden and Turkey.
Data collected each month are weighted so that each country’s sample composition best reflects the demographic profile of the adult population according to the country’s most recent census data. Data collected each month are also weighted to give each country an equal weight in the total “global” sample.  Online surveys can be taken as representative of the general working age population in Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Poland, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, and the United States. Online samples in Brazil, China, India, Israel, Mexico, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa and Turkey are more urban, more educated and/or more affluent than the general population and the results should be viewed as reflecting the views of a more “connected” population.