After Covid-19: Putting people before politics is key to recovery

People all over the world want political leaders to look at their country’s needs first, before any political issues, when working towards recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic. They essentially want their leaders to be statesmen and not politicians during this period.

This is the most important result from an online Ipsos Global Advisor study conducted from 22 January 2021 to 5 February 2021. A total of 20,520 adults in 28 countries were asked about what they expect from political leaders.

In another part of this study, results show that citizens all over the world think that politicians are paid too much for what they do, so what do they then expect from politicians?

Mentioned by a third of people (33%) and equally likely to be picked out by men and women, the most important quality that people want from their political leaders in order to be considered to do a good job in handling the recovery from the pandemic is to put their country’s needs before politics.

This is followed by being honest with the public (29%), understanding the problems facing ordinary people (28%), taking into account the impact on the economy as well as on health (25%) and making the right decisions at the right time (25%).

Women are slightly more likely to pick out the following over men:

  • For political leaders to understand the problems facing ordinary people (30% for women vs 26% for men);
  • To take into account the impact on the economy as well as health (27% for women vs 22% for men); and
  • To act quickly to protect people in their country (26% for women vs 22% for men).

Looking at the results from all 28 countries, South Africans felt the strongest of all about wanting their politicians to regard the country’s needs as a priority above politics. This sentiment was shared by more than half (51%) of online South Africans.

South Africans felt the strongest of all about wanting their politicians to regard the country’s needs as a priority above politics. This sentiment was shared by more than half of online South Africans

 

Technical Detail:
  • These are the results of a 28-country survey conducted by Ipsos on its Global Advisor online platform. Ipsos interviewed a total of 20,520 adults aged 18-74 in the United States, Canada, Israel, Malaysia, South Africa, and Turkey, and 16-74 in 21 other markets between 22 January and 5 February 2021.
  • The sample consists of approximately 1,000 individuals in each of Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, mainland China, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Japan, Spain, and the U.S., and 500 individuals in each of Argentina, Chile, Hungary, Hong Kong, India, Israel, Malaysia, Mexico, the Netherlands, Peru, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden, and Turkey.
  • The samples in Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Poland, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, and the U.S. can be taken as representative of their general adult population under the age of 75.
  • The samples in Brazil, Chile, mainland China, India, Israel, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, and Turkey are more urban, more educated, and/or more affluent than the general population. The survey results for these markets should be viewed as reflecting the views of the more “connected” segment of their population.
  • The data is weighted so that each country’s sample composition best reflects the demographic profile of the covered adult population according to the most recent census data.
  • Where results do not sum to 100 or the difference appears to be +/-1 more/less than the actual, this may be due to rounding, multiple responses, or the exclusion of “don't know” or not stated responses.
  • The precision of Ipsos online polls is calculated using a credibility interval with a poll of 1,000 accurate to +/- 3.5 percentage points and of 500 accurate to +/- 5.0 percentage points. For more information on Ipsos' use of credibility intervals, please visit the Ipsos website. The publication of these findings abides by local rules and regulations.

 

For more information on this news release, please contact:

Mari Harris
Director and Political Analyst
[email protected]

Ezethu Nsiki
Service Line Manager: Public Affairs
[email protected]

Society