Biggest threats to India? 87% Urban Indians fear a terrorist attack taking place in India ; 87% fear a natural disaster occuring in India: Ipsos-Halifax World Affairs Global Threats Assessment Survey

75% Indians are confident that the government can deal with terror threats and 77% are confident of govt’s ability in dealing with natural disaster 77% urban Indians believe world became more dangerous over last year India is ominous of all threats – of security, safety and wellbeing

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  • Madhurima Bhatia Media Relations and Content lead
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According to the Ipsos-Halifax World Affairs Global Threats Assessment Survey, which evaluated threats which each market was wary of, Urban Indians were found to be concerned about all threats, whether about security, safety or health, though at the top of the heap was about security and safety – at least 87% of urban Indians polled fear a terror strike taking place in the country and 87% fear a natural disaster taking place in the country.

"Despite taking major steps, India has been facing terror attacks. India has heavily invested in state of the art surveillance and scanning machines, yet given our vast geography and population, fear is lurking in the minds of urban Indians. Govt has been issuing safety warnings for utmost vigilance to the citizens. Likewise, natural disasters occur due to climate change and it is a challenge and a threat," says Amit Adarkar, CEO, Ipsos India & Operations Director, APAC, Ipsos. 

Perception of Threats

Further, majority of Indians enlist a number of threats facing the nation: 82% Indians fear being hacked for fraudulent or espionage purposes; 79% fear a violent conflict breaking out between ethnic minority groups in the country; 78% fear a nuclear, biological or chemical attack taking place somewhere in the world; 77% feel threatened by India being involved in an armed conflict with another nation; 75% fear a major health epidemic breaking out in the country; 74% fear personal safety of them and their family members being violated.       

"I would say, urban Indians are riding on caution. A case of safety saves and it’s more a manifestation of being prepared for the worst, at the same time, taking measures that forestall ominous occurings. Also these threats emanate from dangers lurking, that have surfaced at some point or the other in the past," added Adarkar. 

How Confident are Indians of the ability of the govt to deal with these threats?

Confidence is high. For all threats. In some cases, threat is larger than our ability to deal with it.

75% Indians feel govt can deal with terror strike taking place in the country and 77% confident about govt’s abilities in handling natural disaster taking place in the country. 70% confident of govt in dealing with threat of hacking for fraudulent or espionage purposes; 71% confident of govt’s ability to deal with violent conflict breaking out between ethnic minority groups in the country; 68% confident nuclear, biological or chemical attack taking place somewhere in the world will be dealt with; 77% confident India being involved in an armed conflict with another nation can be averted or dealt with; 75% confident major health epidemic breaking out in the country can be handled; 69% confident  personal safety of them and their family members being violated can be averted or handled.       

Interestingly, at least 79% of urban Indians polled feel things are improving than worsening. Though 77% of urban Indians polled feel that compared to last year, the world has become more dangerous. 

S No

Threat Perception

India

Global

Confidence in tackling

(India)

1

Terror Strike

87%

65%

75%

2

Natural disaster

87%

66%

77%

3

Being hacked for fraud & espionage

82%

75%

70%

4

Violent conflict between ethnic/ minority group

79%

60%

71%

5

Nuclear, biological or chemical attack somewhere in the world

78%

68%

68%

6

Our country in armed conflict with another nation

77%

48%

77%

7

Outbreak of major health epidemic

75%

51%

71%

8

Theirs & their family members personal safety and security being violated

74%

61%

69%

Methodology

These are the findings of the Global Advisor wave 131, an Ipsos survey conducted between August 23rd and September 6th, 2019.

The survey instrument is conducted monthly in 28 countries around the world via the Ipsos Online Panel system.

The countries reporting herein are Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, China, Chile, France, Great Britain, Germany, Hungary, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Turkey and the United States of America.

For the results of the survey presented herein, an international sample of 18,526 adults aged 18-74 in the U.S., South Africa, New Zealand, Turkey and Canada, and age 16-74 in all other countries, were interviewed. Approximately 1000+ individuals participated on a country by country basis via the Ipsos Online Panel with the exception of Argentina, Belgium, Chile, Colombia, Hungary, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, Peru, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden and Turkey, where each have a sample approximately 500+. The precision of Ipsos online polls are calculated using a credibility interval with a poll of 1,000 accurate to +/- 3.1 percentage points and of 500 accurate to +/- 4.5 percentage points. For more information on the Ipsos use of credibility intervals, please visit the Ipsos website.

15 of the 28 countries surveyed online generate nationally representative samples in their countries (Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Poland, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, and U.S.).

Brazil, China, Chile, Colombia, India, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa and Turkey produce a national sample that is more urban & educated, and with higher incomes than their fellow citizens.  We refer to these respondents as “Upper Deck Consumer Citizens”.  They are not nationally representative of their country.

 

The author(s)

  • Madhurima Bhatia Media Relations and Content lead

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