Qualification, Confidence, Intelligence & Hardwork are the top factors that help women get ahead in life says Ipsos World Questions Survey: What helps or hinders women’s equality?

Only 9% credit looks for getting ahead Women in politics & govt, women in senior positions will be the biggest drivers of enhancing gender equality, next 25 years

The author(s)

  • Amit Adarkar CEO Ipsos in India
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New Delhi, Nov. 15, 2019: There is of late a huge global focus on Gender Equality, Diversity and Inclusion.

A global survey by Ipsos in partnership with the Global Institute for Women’s Leadership, Policy Institute, World Questions: What helps or hinders gender equality? - unlocks the key factors that help women get ahead; it is particularly interesting as it provides insights across all markets put together (at the global level) and by local markets.

What works for Indian women? Top factors that propel them forward are achievable on their own

According to urban Indians, the top 6 factors that lead to elevating women’s status are – qualification (31%), confidence (31%), intelligence (30%), hardwork (30%), never giving up (24%) and being brave (24%). The other factors that matter, include, success (19%), competence (18%), politeness (13%), good behavior (12%), having a sense of humour (11%) ; how women look – only 9% feel, helps them get ahead.

And for global women?

The drivers are somewhat different: Hardwork (29%) is at the top, followed by intelligence (27%), qualification (27%), competence (27%), confidence (25%) and never giving up (25%). 

What makes Indian men get ahead – we found out!

Hardwork (37%) sits at the top, followed by intelligence (29%), qualification (27%), confidence (25%), success (19%), competence (17%) and Never giving up (17%), being brave (16%), political connections (15%), being well behaved (15%), being polite and kind to others (13%), good sense of humour (11%) and their looks (8%).

"The findings definitely challenge age old beliefs about what works for women and men. These findings provide insights to citizens as well as marketers – citizens, when they look at the hierarchy of priorities for elevation of status and a better life – and marketers, of how they communicate in their adverts – we see a bit of a disconnect between what is portrayed and what actually works for a better life," says Amit Adarkar, CEO, Ipsos India & Operations Director, Ipsos APEC  (Asia Pacific excluding China).   

 

No image Factors stopping Indian women from achieving gender equality with men

For Indian women, urban Indians blame it on several factors – women lacking financial independence (22%), lack of education for men & boys (21%), too few women in positions of political power (17%), police not taking Violence Against Women (VAW) seriously (17%), employers not promoting women to senior positions (17%), employers not helping women to balance work & care responsibilities (17%), lack of knowledge around issues faced (16%), employers not addressing gender pay gap (15%), lack of access to education for women/ girls (15%), among others.  

Interestingly, for global women, factors inhibiting their growth largely are to do with work policies: Employers not addressing gender pay gap (22%) is cited as the top global factor hindering progress of women. Others being, employers not helping women to balance work and care responsibilities (21%), employers not promoting women to senior positions (18%), lack of education for men and boys (17%), government not promoting equality (17%), men not helping achieve equality (15%) etc. 

"Indian women largely either don’t work or are in the informal sector, where they get a short shrift. Lack of financial independence is the biggest stumbling block in their progress," added Adarkar.

Areas that have made most progress for Indian women – in achieving equality between men and women over the past 25 years.

Top factors that have greatly contributed in reducing inequalities between men and women are – women having equal access to education (44%), women having jobs in science and technology (36%), women being represented in govt and politics (35%), women’s participation in sport (34%), women having reached CEO/ board positions (33%), among others.

Next 25 years, what will work in further achieving gender equality?

 Top factors listed include - Women represented in govt and politics (42%), women holding senior positions in business (36%), women having equal access to education (36%), women having jobs in science and technology (34%) women reaching CEO/ Board positions (32%).

"Women will further need to get into the male dominated bastions (power centres) to reduce the gap," added Adarkar.

Technical Details

The survey is an international sample of 19,943 adults aged 18-74 in the United States and Canada and 16-74 in all other countries. Interviews were conducted between 20 September and 4 October 2019.

The survey was conducted in 28 countries around the world, via the Ipsos Online Panel system in Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, France, Germany, Hungary, India, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, Peru, Poland, Russia, Serbia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, Great Britain, and the USA.

Approximately 1000 individuals were surveyed in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Spain, Great Britain, and the USA. Approximately 500 individuals were surveyed in Argentina, Belgium, Chile, Hungary, India, Mexico, Malaysia, Netherlands, Peru, Poland, Russia, Serbia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden, Turkey.

Where results do not sum to 100 or the “difference” appears to be+-1 more/less than the actual, this may be due to rounding, multiple responses or the exclusion of don't knows or not stated responses.

Data was weighted to match the profile of the population. 17 of the 28 countries surveyed generate nationally representative samples in their countries (Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Poland, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, and United States). Brazil, Chile, China, India, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, Russia, Serbia, Singapore, South Africa and Turkey produce a national sample that is considered to represent a more affluent, connected population. These are still a vital social group to understand in these countries, representing an important and emerging middle class.

 

The author(s)

  • Amit Adarkar CEO Ipsos in India

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