Mobility Pricing in Metro Vancouver

These are some of the results of an online survey conducted by Ipsos on behalf of the Mobility Pricing Independent Commission.

Mobility Pricing in Metro Vancouver

The author(s)

  • Kyle Braid Senior Vice President, Canada, Ipsos Public Affairs
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Vancouver, BC, October 25, 2017 — These are some of the results of an online survey conducted by Ipsos on behalf of the Mobility Pricing Independent Commission.

Prompted Frustrations Moving Around Metro Vancouver

Congestion and unpredictability are the two biggest prompted frustrations of moving around in Metro Vancouver. Nine-in-ten residents (89%) say ‘delays caused by high traffic volumes’ make them feel ‘a great deal’ or ‘some’ frustration. Eight-in-ten (80%) are frustrated by ‘unpredictability of travel times’. Other higher rated frustrations include ‘crowding on transit’ (73%), ‘transportation costs/affordability’ (70%) and ‘delays caused by accidents’ (70%).

  • Younger residents are much more likely than others to be frustrated by ‘crowding on transit’ (+16 points vs. overall) and by ‘frequency of transit service’ (+12 points vs overall). They are also more likely to be frustrated by ‘transportation costs/affordability’ (+8 points vs. overall) and ‘unpredictability of travel times’ (+6 points vs. overall).

There are also differences by region, although they are smaller than the differences by age.

  • South of Fraser residents are more frustrated than others by the ‘condition of roads’ (+9 points vs. overall) and by ‘delays caused by accidents’ (+7 points vs. overall).
  • Vancouver residents are more frustrated by ‘crowding on transit’ (+6 points vs. overall) and by ‘bike path network and safety’ (+5 points versus overall).
  • Burnaby/New Westminster residents are more frustrated by ‘crowding on transit’ (+9 points vs. overall).
  • North Shore residents are more frustrated by ‘delays caused by accidents’ (+7 points vs. overall).

Negative Impacts of Frustrations

Almost half of residents (46%) say that their transportation frustrations have either a 'major' (10%) or 'moderate' (36%) negative impact on their 'own quality of life'. Residents are more likely to say the transportation frustrations have a negative impact (major or moderate) on broader concerns such as 'the overall quality of life for Metro Vancouverites' (61% negative), 'the local environment' (57% negative) and 'the region's economy' (52% negative).

  • Younger residents (55% negative) and North Shore residents (52% negative) are the most likely to say their transportation frustrations have a negative impact on their 'own quality of life'.
  • Men (57% negative) and South of Fraser residents (57% negative) are the most likely to say their transportation frustrations have a negative impact on 'the region's economy'.
  • Older residents (62% negative) are the most likely to say their transportation frustrations have a negative impact on 'the local environment'.

Weekly Time Lost from Frustrations

Eight-in-ten (81%) Metro Vancouver residents say their transportation frustrations cost them at least some time each week.

  • Reported time lost is higher among younger residents (93% at least some time lost), North Shore residents (91% at least some time lost), and men (86% at least some time lost).
  • Time lost is lower among older residents (71% at least some time lost), Northeast residents (72% at least some time lost) and women (76% at least some time lost).

Agreement with Mobility Pricing Statements

Survey respondents were asked to agree or disagree with four different statements about mobility pricing. The responses, though tending toward positive views of mobility pricing, do show some negativity and some substantial uncertainty.

A slim majority (53%) of residents agree that 'mobility pricing could be more fair by paying for what I use' (19% disagree, 28% neutral/no opinion).

Nearly half of residents (47%) agree that 'mobility pricing could make getting around more affordable for me, in that I’ll pay for what I use' (25% disagree, 29% neutral/no opinion).

  • Agreement is higher among Vancouver residents (53% agree) and younger residents (52% agree).

Nearly half (46%) of residents also agree that 'mobility pricing supports investment in our future transportation and transit' (17% disagree, 37% neutral/no opinion).

  • Agreement is higher among younger residents (53% agree) and residents of Vancouver (52% agree) and Burnaby/New Westminster (51% agree). Agreement is lower among Northeast region residents (40% agree).

Slightly fewer residents (43%) agree that 'I would be willing to pay some amount of money to have less road congestion' (30% disagree, 28% neutral/no opinion).

  • Agreement is higher among North Shore residents (51% agree), men (50% agree vs. 36% of women) and younger residents (48% agree).

Yes/No Mobility Pricing Questions

Survey respondents were asked five 'yes/no' questions about mobility pricing.

Two-thirds (66%) of residents say they are aware that we have mobility pricing already in Metro Vancouver such as fuel taxes and transit fares.

  • Awareness is higher among North Shore residents (74%), men (74% vs. 59% of women) and older residents (73% vs. 60% of younger).

Only four-in-ten residents (40%) think our current system is fair for paying for our road and transit system through fuel taxes, hydro fees, transit fares, parking taxes, and property taxes. A similar proportion (36%) says it is unfair and one-quarter are undecided (24%).

  • Perceived fairness is higher among Vancouver residents (46% say fair) and younger residents (45% say fair).

Six-in-ten residents (60%) say they would like to know and be able to track how much they are spending in total, to move around Metro Vancouver. One-quarter (23%) say they would not like to track their spending and 16% are undecided.

  • The desire to track spending is higher among men (65%) and the 35 to 54 years age group (65%). It is lower among older residents (54%).

Almost half of residents (46%) say they would change the way they move around Metro Vancouver if we had a mobility pricing system where we pay directly for road use. Three-in-ten (29%) say they wouldn't make changes such as taking different routes, or using transit instead of driving, while one-quarter (25%) are undecided.

  • Younger residents (53% would change vs. 40% of older residents) and men (51% would change vs. 43% of women) are the most likely to say they would make changes to the way they move around the region.

About six-in-ten residents (62%) say they believe it is worthwhile to study ways to make transportation pricing in this region more efficient and fair so that all users pay according to how they use the transportation system. Two-in-ten (20%) say this study is not worthwhile and 18% are undecided.

  • Interest in studying ways to make pricing more efficient/fair is highest among Burnaby/New Westminster residents (73% worthwhile).

Personal Importance of Commission Objectives

Metro Vancouver residents rate all three of the Commission's objectives as important ('very' or 'somewhat'). Nearly nine-in-ten (86%) say it is important to them to 'relieve congestion on roads and bridges across the region, so people and goods can keep moving and business can thrive and be competitive.' Eight-in-ten say it is important to 'promote fairness to address concerns around tolling and to support accessibility and choice in transportation for Metro Vancouver residents' (80%) and to 'support investment to improve the current transportation system in Metro Vancouver for all users' (78%).

Most Important Commission Objective

Asked to select a single most important objective, Metro Vancouver residents are most likely to select relieving congestion (44%). Promoting fairness is the second choice (29%) followed in third by supporting investment (17%). One-in-ten (9%) are undecided.

  • North Shore residents (55%), men (49%) and younger residents (49%) are the most likely to select relieving congestion as their most important objective. Northeast residents (35%) are the most likely to choose promoting fairness.

About the Study

These are some of the findings of an Ipsos poll conducted online between September 12 and 19, 2017 on behalf of the Mobility Pricing Independent Commission. For this survey, a sample of 1,002 adult (18+) Metro Vancouver residents was interviewed. Weighting was then employed to balance demographics to ensure that the sample's composition reflects that of the adult population according to Census data (age, gender and region) and to provide results intended to approximate the sample universe. The precision of Ipsos online polls is measured using a credibility interval. In this case, the poll is accurate to within ±3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20. The credibility interval will be wider among subsets of the population. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error, and measurement error.

For more information on this news release, please contact:

Kyle Braid
Senior Vice President, Canada
Ipsos Public Affairs
+1 778 373-5130
kyle.braid@ipsos.com

About Ipsos Public Affairs

Ipsos Public Affairs is a non-partisan, objective, survey-based research practice made up of seasoned professionals. We conduct strategic research initiatives for a diverse number of Canadian American and international organizations, based not only on public opinion research, but elite stakeholder, corporate, and media opinion research.

Ipsos has media partnerships with the most prestigious news organizations around the world. In Canada, Ipsos Public Affairs is the polling partner for Global News. Internationally, Ipsos Public Affairs is the media polling supplier to Reuters News, the world's leading source of intelligent information for businesses and professionals. Ipsos Public Affairs is a member of the Ipsos Group, a leading global survey-based market research company. We provide boutique-style customer service and work closely with our clients, while also undertaking global research.

About Ipsos

Ipsos is an independent market research company controlled and managed by research professionals. Founded in France in 1975, Ipsos has grown into a worldwide research group with a strong presence in all key markets. Ipsos ranks fourth in the global research industry.

With offices in 88 countries, Ipsos delivers insightful expertise across five research specializations: brand, advertising and media; customer loyalty; marketing; public affairs research; and survey management.

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Ipsos has been listed on the Paris Stock Exchange since 1999 and generated global revenues of €1,782.7 million in 2016.

The author(s)

  • Kyle Braid Senior Vice President, Canada, Ipsos Public Affairs

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