92% Urban Indians optimistic Circa 2020 will be better than previous year; 83% bullish about performance of global economy

Optimism, trends & concerns sum up this year’s - Ipsos Predictions 2020 Survey Circa 2019 was a disastrous year for India & Indians

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  • Madhurima Bhatia Media Relations and Content lead
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How is Circa 2020 likely to pan out? According to the latest global survey by Ipsos titled Predictions 2020 Survey, 92% urban Indians are optimistic that Circa 2020 will be a better year for them, than 2019 and 83 per cent are bullish about  the performance of the global economy in Circa 2020 and predict that it will be on a stronger footing vis-à-vis 2019; China is most optimistic about the performance of the global economy (84%) and is placed a notch higher than India (Philippines is tied in with India at the 2nd spot); global citizens though are riding on caution and only half of those polled (52%) predict a bumper year for the global economy.

Predictions captures views of citizens on some of the key issues straddling World Affairs, Society & Culture, Technology and Outlook, to understand from them, how they foresee Circa 2020 would unfold. The survey findings are a mixed bag. There is optimism on the one hand, then we also see some bit of skepticism and concerns too surface around macro issues.

"The survey provides a panoramic view of what is likely to dominate global events and it is a good opportunity for countries to be mindful of what the citizens are thinking, bang in the beginning of the year and address their concerns and measure up to their expectations," said Amit Adarkar, CEO, India & APAC Operations Director, Ipsos.    

Outlook 2020

83% Indians are bullish about the performance of the global economy in 2020, though only half of global citizens echo similar view; 71% urban Indians are confident there will be pay parity for women –paid same as men for the same work (only 44% global citizens are hopeful); 75% urban Indians are confident that Indian sports persons will up their medal tally in the 2020 Summer Olympics (only 43% global citizens feel their teams will bag more medals in the summer Olympics); further, a whopping 92 per cent of the urban Indians polled are confident that the year 2020 will be better for them, personally, vis-à-vis 2019 (75% global citizens too feel this year will be better).

Top trends predicted for 2020

82% urban Indians foresee people around the world spending more time online than watching TV (78% of the global citizens polled, hold a similar view); at a personal level, 72% of urban Indians say that they will be watching more TV from streaming services as opposed to cable/ satellite or over the air (half of global citizens (50%) too cite similar preference this year). There is over estimation seen for self-driving cars among urban Indians – 61% per cent urban Indians predict, self-driving cars (autonomous vehicles) will be usual sightings on the streets of their cities (only 36% global citizens foresee this happening). Almost half of urban Indians (48%) predict a re-election for Donald Trump as the President of the United States (35% of global citizens too feel the same). 37% urban Indians believe aliens will descend on Earth (only 15% of global citizens believe it will happen so), this year.

Top concerns of 2020

Global warming is top concern. 78% urban Indians worry that average global temperatures will further soar in 2020 (77% global citizens too predict the same); 46% urban Indians fear major stock markets around the world to crash in 2020 (35% global citizens too fear); 4 in 10 Indians are apprehensive of a terror strike in 2020 (32% global citizens too); half of urban Indians (52%) dread a natural disaster taking place in 2020, that will impact people in their own town/ city (3 in 10 global citizens too fear); over half of urban Indians (55%) fear large scale public unrest (protests & riots)  taking place in India, in 2020, to rebel against the way the country is being run (56% global citizens too predict unrest in their countries, for poor governance); 69% urban Indians foresee traffic situation in their area to worsen  (58% global citizens have a similar concern around traffic in their area); 4 in 10 Indians (42%) fear one of their online accounts (email, social media or banking) will be hacked in 2020 (37% global citizens have a similar concern).  Half of urban Indians polled (50%) fear feeling lonely most of the time in 2020. Only 3 in 10 global citizens (33%) are likely to feel lonely.  

Personal goals

90 per cent of urban Indians polled consciously want to make personal goals and resolutions in 2020, to focus on specific things for themselves and for others. Interestingly, 76% of global citizens too want to operate this way, in 2020!  46% urban Indians say they will reduce screen time for social media, this year. 27% global citizens too want to spend less time on social media, this year.  

Reflections – Circa 2019

Verdict pronounced: 2019 fell short on expectations, for the country as well as for the citizens themselves, at a personal level.

Year 2019 turned out to be a disastrous year for India, feel 61% of urban Indians polled. 65% of global citizens too feel that 2019 was horrible for their countries.

Personally too, 2019 did not delight Indians (58%) or global citizens (50%), it was a rocky year for them and their families. 

Methodology

These are the findings of the Global Advisor Wave predictions survey for 2020.  In total 22,512 interviews were conducted between 26th November–6th December 2019, among adults aged 18-64 years in the US and Canada, and adults aged 16-64 years in all other markets.

The survey was conducted in 33 markets around the world via the Ipsos Online Panel system: Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Colombia, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Hong Kong, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Turkey and the United States.

For the results of the survey presented herein, an international sample of 21,011 adults aged 18-64 in the US, Israel and Canada, and age 16-64 in all other markets, were interviewed. Approximately 1,000 individuals participated on a market by market basis via the Ipsos Online Panel, with the exception of Argentina, Belgium, Chile, Colombia, Hong Kong, Hungary, India, Israel, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden and Turkey, where each have a sample approximately 500.

Weighting was then employed to balance demographics and ensure that the sample's composition reflects that of the adult population according to the most recent country Census data, and to provide results intended to approximate the sample universe. A survey with an unweighted probability sample of this size and a 100% response rate would have an estimated margin of error of +/-3.1 percentage points for a sample of 1,000 and an estimated margin of error of +/- 4.5 percentage points 19 times out of 20 per country of what the results would have been had the entire population of adults in that country had been polled. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error, and measurement error.

17 of the 33 markets surveyed online generate nationally representative samples in their countries (Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Israel, Italy, Japan, Poland, Serbia, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, and United States).

Brazil, Chile, China, Hong Kong, India, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, Peru, Philippines, Romania, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Africa and Turkey produce a national sample that is more urban & educated, and with higher incomes than their fellow citizens.  We refer to these respondents as “Upper Deck Consumer Citizens”.  They are not nationally representative of their markets.

Where results do not sum to 100, this may be due to computer rounding, multiple responses or the exclusion of don't knows or not stated responses.

Data is weighted to match the profile of the population.

 

The author(s)

  • Madhurima Bhatia Media Relations and Content lead

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