Public Perspectives: Fake News, Internet Bubbles, Post-truth and trust

This report explores awareness and concern about fake news, internet bubbles and post-truth-politics in Canada and around the world.

Public Perspectives: Fake News, Internet Bubbles, Post-truth and trust

The author(s)

  • Mike Colledge President / Président, Canada, Ipsos Public Affairs
  • Sean Simpson Vice President, Canada, Ipsos Public Affairs
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Themes from the data are:

  • Seven-in-ten Canadians believe that the average person in the country lives in their own “bubble” on the internet, but only three-in-ten believe this about themselves.
  • Canadians lack confidence that the average person can tell real news from fake news, but they are significantly more confident in their own abilities to do so.  Men are particularly confident in their ability to spot fake news.
  • Half of Canadians say they have seen fake news stories, significantly lower compared to the US and most other countries.
  • Canadians blame personal bias, politicians, and the media/social media for misperceptions.
  • A majority of Canadians believe that the average person trusts politicians less today than in the past, driven by a belief that lying in politics and the media is more prevalent today; Americans significantly more skeptical than Canadians.
     

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The author(s)

  • Mike Colledge President / Président, Canada, Ipsos Public Affairs
  • Sean Simpson Vice President, Canada, Ipsos Public Affairs

Society