Nine in Ten (92%) Canadians Want their Government to Ensure Domestic Military Pilot Training to Fortify National Sovereignty

Canadians are looking inwards at how best to secure sovereignty and domestic economic growth: this extends to Canadian defence and security acquisitions

The author(s)

  • Sean Simpson Vice President, Canada, Public Affairs
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Toronto, ON, September 20, 2021 — As the pandemic continues to exert pressures, Canadians are looking inwards at how best to secure sovereignty and domestic economic growth. According to a recent survey study conducted by Ipsos, 4 out of 5 Canadians (83%) agree that it is a priority to retain Canada’s key capacity to train military pilots under Canadian control. Sovereignty remains at the forefront of Canadians’ minds, with a near consensus (92%) agreeing that it is essential to national sovereignty and security that Canada retain the training of its military pilots.

Canadians want to see domestic reinvestment and sovereign stability in defence and security acquisitions

Canadians continue to strongly support reinvestment into the Canadian economy: 9 in 10 Canadians (91%) agree that when the Canadian government makes major defence and security acquisitions, it should focus primarily on buying services and equipment from domestic companies.

Buying Canadian is a strong consideration for military pilot training too with 3 in 5 (58%) Canadians feeling it even trumps cost. That said, with budgets tightening, 2 in 5 Canadians (42%) indicate that what matters most to them is that Canada should seek out the lowest cost solution for military pilot training, regardless of whether the provider is Canadian or foreign owned.

Canadians are divided on Canada’s military pilot training leadership status

Canadians are divided on Canada’s status as a leader in training military pilots. 1 in 10 Canadians (10%) believe that Canada is ahead of other countries in its achievements, a third of Canadians (31%) believe it’s on par, and 1 in 5 (22%) believe Canada is falling behind. However, a significant proportion of nearly 2 in 5 Canadians simply don’t know (37%) about Canada’s place amongst leading countries in military pilot training.

Fully 4 out of 5 (80%) Canadians admit that they didn’t know of Canada’s leadership in military pilot training since the Second World War.

 

About the Study

These are some of the findings of an Ipsos poll conducted between August 10th to 12th, 2021, on behalf of SkyAlyne. For this survey, a sample of 1,000 Canadians over the age of 18 were interviewed. Weighting was then employed to balance demographics to ensure that the sample's composition reflects that of the adult population according to Census data and to provide results intended to approximate the sample universe. The precision of Ipsos online polls is measured using a credibility interval. In this case, the poll is accurate to within ±3.5 percentage points, 19 times out of 20, had all Canadian adults been polled. The credibility interval will be wider among subsets of the population. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error, and measurement error.

For more information on this news release, please contact:

Sean Simpson
Vice President, Canada, Public Affairs
+1 416 324-2002
[email protected]

 

About Ipsos

Ipsos is the world’s third largest market research company, present in 90 markets and employing more than 18,000 people.

Our passionately curious research professionals, analysts and scientists have built unique multi-specialist capabilities that provide true understanding and powerful insights into the actions, opinions and motivations of citizens, consumers, patients, customers or employees. We serve more than 5000 clients across the world with 75 business solutions.

Founded in France in 1975, Ipsos is listed on the Euronext Paris since July 1st, 1999. The company is part of the SBF 120 and the Mid-60 index and is eligible for the Deferred Settlement Service (SRD).

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The author(s)

  • Sean Simpson Vice President, Canada, Public Affairs

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