Mental Health in New Zealand

Ipsos recently conducted a study across 30 countries to explore the mental and physical wellbeing of people. Read our report to see what New Zealanders think and how we compare to the rest of the world.

The author(s)

  • Amanda Dudding Director, Public Affairs Research
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Just 20% of New Zealanders believe mental and physical health are treated equally in the healthcare system according to an Ipsos Global Advisor Study. The majority (59%) believe physical health is treated as more important than mental health.

 

Other highlights from the key findings include:

  • New Zealanders are significantly more likely to think of their physical wellbeing than their mental wellbeing.
  • Women tend to think about their mental wellbeing more often than men.
  • Younger New Zealanders (aged 18-34) think about their mental wellbeing more often than older age groups.
  • Relationships with friends and family are seen as having the biggest effect on mental wellbeing, followed by finances and their job or work–life balance.
  • Finances have the biggest effect on mental wellbeing for those aged 35–49 years.
  • 20% of New Zealanders believe that mental health and physical health are treated equally in the New Zealand healthcare system (compared to 27% in Australia, 20% in Great Britain 20%, and 23% in the U.S.).
  • The majority of New Zealanders see the value in spending on mental health services, with 71% disagreeing that increased spending on mental health services is a waste of money.
  • The majority of New Zealanders (73%) agree that mental illness is an illness like any other. A similar proportion (76%) agree that we need to adopt a far more tolerant attitude toward people with mental illness in our society.
  • In terms of attitudes towards mental health in society, 74% of New Zealanders agree that seeing a mental health professional is a sign of strength, and over half (54%) do not agree that anyone with a history of mental illness should be excluded from public office.

The author(s)

  • Amanda Dudding Director, Public Affairs Research

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