Move Over Single's Bars, Online Dating Taking Hold

A Majority Of Americans (52%) Think That People Have A Better (44%) Or At Least Equal (8%) Chance Of Meeting Someone Online Than At A Single's Bar Four-In-Ten (40%) Think That A Relationship Initiated Online Has A Better (32%) Or Equal (8%) Chance Of Success Than One Initiated In A Singles Bar Three-In-Ten (29%) Would (27%) Or Might (2%) Recommend Online Dating As An Alternative Way Of Meeting Other Singles To Their Single Friends

Philadelphia, PA - September 30, 2002 - Bursting onto the dating scene in any big way only a few years ago, online dating services are becoming an increasingly accepted alternative among Americans. A recent Ipsos-Reid poll for LavalifeTM shows that a majority of Americans (52%) think that people have a better (44%) or at least equal (8%) chance of meeting someone they like online than at a single's bar. Four-in-ten (40%) think that a relationship initiated online has a better (32%) or equal (8%) chance of success than one initiated in a singles bar. And three-in-ten (29%) would (27%) or might (2%) recommend online dating as an alternative way of meeting other singles to their single friends.

These are the findings from Lavalife'sTM Online Dating Poll conducted by Ipsos-Reid in conjunction with Mansfield Communications between September 17 and September 19, 2002. The poll is based on a randomly selected sample of 1000 adult Americans. With a sample of this size, the results are considered accurate to within 177 3.1 percentage points, 19 times out of 20, of what they would have been had the entire adult US population been polled. The margin of error will be larger within regions and for other sub-groupings of the survey population. Results are statistically weighted to ensure the sample's regional age and gender composition reflects that of the actual American population according to 2000 US Census data.

The poll reveals further that on-line dating services are becoming an increasingly acceptable alternative across all regions of the country and demographic groups. If anything, it is being led by higher income households and the better educated. For example:

Chances of meeting someone online versus a single's bar

  • 60% of $50,000/more households and 56% of college graduates think that people have a better or equal chance of meeting someone they like online than at a single's bar. This compares with 50% of $25,000-$50,000 income households and less than $25,000 households, and 54% of those with some college and 48% of those with high school or less.
  • Among other subgroups, 55% of men and 50% of women think that people have a better or equal chance of meeting someone they like online than at a single's bar. This is also true among 53% of those aged 18-34 years, 57% of 35-54 year olds and 46% of those aged 55 years or more, 55% of those who are currently married and 51% of those who are currently single, and 51% of residents in the Northeast, 52% Midwest, 53% South and 53% West.

Recommend online dating services as an alternative to single friends

  • 35% of $50,000/more households and 31% of college graduates would or might recommend online dating as an alternative to a single friend. This is also true among 28% of $25,000-$50,000 income households and 27% of less than $25,000 households, and 30% of those with some college and 27% of those with high school or less.
  • Among other subgroups, 35% of men and 23% of women would or might recommend online dating as an alternative to a single friend. This is also true among 33% of those aged 18-34 years, 31% of 35-54 year olds and 22% of those aged 55 years or more, 29% of those who are currently married and 29% of those who are currently single, and 30% of residents in the Northeast, 25% Midwest, 28% South and 33% West.

To view the release and tables, please open the attached PDF files.

-30- For more information on this news release, please contact: Thom Riehle President & CEO US Public Affairs Ipsos-Reid (202) 463-7300

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