Who Is and Is Not a “Real American”, a “Real Brazilian” or a “Real Chinese”?

Ipsos’s Inclusiveness Index compares countries’ acceptance of social and cultural diversity.

The author(s)

  • Nicolas Boyon Public Affairs, US
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An Ipsos Global Advisor survey shows Canada and the United States have the most inclusive definition of nationality, followed by South Africa, France, and Australia. These countries score highest on an Inclusiveness Index reflecting social acceptance of diversity as it applies to religion, immigration, sexual orientation and gender identity, political views, and criminal background.

Overall Inclusiveness Index

Canada

55

 

Great Britain

35

 

South Korea

9

United States

54

 

Mexico

33

 

Russia

9

South Africa

52

 

Belgium

30

 

Hungary

6

France

46

 

Poland

24

 

Turkey

-6

Australia

44

 

Italy

22

 

Japan

-6

Chile

42

 

Brazil

22

 

Serbia

-8

Argentina

40

 

Germany

20

 

Malaysia

-17

Sweden

38

 

Peru

19

 

Saudi Arabia

-28

Spain

36

 

The Overall Inclusiveness Index is based on the findings of an Ipsos Global Advisor survey conducted in April and May 2018. For the study, Ipsos interviewed over 20,700 men and women in 27 countries about as many as 28 types of people. For each type, respondents were asked if they consider such a person to be a “real” national (e.g., “a real American” in the U.S., “a real Brazilian” in Brazil, etc.) or not. The Overall Inclusiveness Index is calculated by averaging the net scores (“real” percentage minus “not real” percentage) for six constructs:

  • Religious Inclusiveness (average of net scores for each of Christians, Muslims, Jews, Buddhists, Hindus, and atheists) – led by France and Canada;
  • Naturalized-Citizen Inclusiveness (net score for naturalized citizens) – led by the U.S. and Australia;
  • Second Generation Inclusiveness (average of net scores for native-born people whose parents immigrated from nine different regions of the world) – led by Canada and Chile;
  • LGBT Inclusiveness (net score for gays, lesbians, bisexual and transgender people) – led by France and Canada;
  • Criminal Background Inclusiveness (net score for people who have been convicted and incarcerated) – led by Canada and South Africa; and
  • Extreme Political Views Inclusiveness (net score for people with extreme political views) – led by South Africa and the U.S.

For benchmarking purposes, the study also explores inclusiveness of people who served in the country’s armed forces (it is highest in the U.S.) and self-perception of locals as “real” nationals (it is most common in China and India).

The study also explores the nature and prevalence of international experience and international connections among people from each country. Serbia and Sweden stand out as the two countries in the study whose citizens are most likely to have lived or traveled abroad and to have personal or professional connections with people from or living in another country.

The survey was conducted in 27 countries via the Ipsos Online Panel system: Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, France, Great Britain, Germany, Hungary, India, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, Poland, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, Turkey and the United States of America.
Interviews were conducted with 20,767 adults aged 18-64 in Canada and the U.S. and 16-64 in all other countries between April 20 and May 4, 2018.
Data is weighted to match the profile of the population.

The author(s)

  • Nicolas Boyon Public Affairs, US

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