Ipsos MORI / DTI Animal Experimentation Study, December 2006

Ipsos MORI has conducted a survey on the general public's views on animal experimentation, on behalf of the Department of Trade and Industry. The study is the fourth in a series examining trends in public attitudes towards the use of animals in research. The first study from which trends have been examined was carried out on behalf of the Medical Research Council (in June-September 1999), with the second and third such studies being on behalf of CMP, the Coalition for Medical Progress (in 2002 and 2005). In March 1999, MORI carried out a study examining public attitudes to animal experimentation generally, and experiments involving mice or monkeys, causing no pain, severe pain, or death [see notes].

Ipsos MORI has conducted a survey on the general public's views on animal experimentation, on behalf of the Department of Trade and Industry. The study is the fourth in a series examining trends in public attitudes towards the use of animals in research. The first study from which trends have been examined was carried out on behalf of the Medical Research Council (in June-September 1999), with the second and third such studies being on behalf of CMP, the Coalition for Medical Progress (in 2002 and 2005). In March 1999, MORI carried out a study examining public attitudes to animal experimentation generally, and experiments involving mice or monkeys, causing no pain, severe pain, or death [see notes].

Notes

  1. New Scientist, 22 May 1999, pps 26-31; Worcester, R., "Science and society: what scientists and the public can learn from each other: essays on science and technology from the Royal Institution", chapter in Cosmic Rays, Catlow and Greenfield (Eds), pps 98-160.

Technical details

Ipsos MORI conducted the interviews among a representative sample of 969 GB adults aged 15 or over. Interviews were carried out face-to-face, in-home in 175 constituency-based sampling points throughout Great Britain between 7-12 December 2006.

More insights about Public Sector