Men Not Emasculated By Caring For Children – But Need Support From Employers

A new global survey finds three-quarters of respondents disagree that a man who stays at home to look after children is less of a man

The author(s)

  • Mallory Newall Director, US, Public Affairs
  • Nicolas Boyon Senior Vice President, US, Public Affairs
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Washington, D.C., March 2, 2019 — The new Ipsos survey across 27 countries, conducted in collaboration with the Global Institute for Women’s Leadership at King’s College London and International Women’s Day, highlights how, in order to share responsibility for childcare, men need more support from employers.

Globally, 75% disagree that a man who stays at home to look after his children is less of a man, compared with one in five (18%) who agree. Americans overall are on par with the global average: 78% disagree, compared with 14% who agree. However, there is a slight gender split, with more American men in agreement (17%) than American women (10%). Younger Americans are also more likely to agree with this statement; 16% of those under 35 and 18% of those aged 35-49 agree, compared to 8% of Americans aged 50-64.

Three-quarters (73%) globally also agree that employers should make it easier for men to combine childcare with work, compared with just 18% who disagree. Again, Americans closely mirror the global trend: 72% agree, including 74% of American men and 69% of American women. Globally, the level of agreement varies with household income. Across all 27 countries, seven in ten (69%) of those with a low household income agree, a figure that rises to three quarters (77%) for those with a high household income.

Close to half (48%) overall think not enough is being done to achieve equal rights between men and women in looking after children and the home. One in five (22%) say the right amount is being done and only one in twenty (5%) think too much is being done. In the U.S., 43% of Americans agree that we’re not doing enough to achieve equality when it comes to looking after children and the home. However, the difference between men and women is stark; half (49%) of American women say not enough is being done, compared with 37% of American men. On the other hand, while 29% of men in the U.S. say the right amount is being done, just 19% of American women agree.

On this issue, women in the U.S. track below the global female average: while two in five (41%) men globally think not enough is being done, this figure rises to over half (55%) of women. Looking at country differences, those most likely to say not enough is being done are Serbia (73%), Spain (63%) and Peru (60%). Whereas those who think too much is being done are in India (12%), Turkey (12%) and Brazil (11%).

Public opinion is split though on how confident people feel about whether discrimination against women looking after the children and the home will have ended in twenty years. Across all countries, two in five (39%) feel confident that discrimination against women looking after children and the home will have ended in 20 years. Roughly the same proportion (42%) say they are not confident. Men are more confident (42%) than women (36%) that discrimination regarding looking after children will have ended in 20 years. Globally, younger people are also more confident on this issue; two in five (42%) of those aged under 35 are confident that discrimination will have ended in 20 years, versus 36% of those aged 50-64.

More Americans are confident than not that discrimination against women regarding looking after children and the home will end in the next 20 years. Two in five (41%) are confident, compared to 30% who are not. However, confidence among women (34%) is much lower than men (48%) in the U.S. Nearly half of Americans under age 35 (47%) are confident this type of gender discrimination will end, while those aged 35 to 49 are more split (36% confident, 34% not).

Methodological Notes

  • Field dates were Friday, December 21st 2018 to Friday, January 4th 2019
  • 16 of the 27 countries surveyed online generate nationally representative samples in their countries (Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Poland, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, and United States).
  • Brazil, Chile, Colombia, India, Malaysia, Mexico, Peru, Russia, Serbia, South Africa and Turkey produce a national sample that is more urban & educated, and with higher incomes than their fellow citizens. We refer to these respondents as “Upper Deck Consumer Citizens”. They are not nationally representative of their country.
  • Approximately 1000+ individuals participated on a country by country basis via the Ipsos Online Panel with the exception of Argentina, Belgium, Chile, Colombia, Hungary, India, Malaysia, Mexico, Netherlands, Peru, Poland, Russia, Serbia, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden and Turkey, where each have a sample approximately 500+.

For more information on this news release please contact:

Mallory Newall
Director, U.S.
Ipsos Public Affairs
+1 202 420-2014
mallory.newall@ipsos.com

Nicolas Boyon
Senior Vice President, U.S.
Ipsos Public Affairs
212.293.6544
Nicolas.Boyon@ipsos.com

About Ipsos

Ipsos is an independent market research company controlled and managed by research professionals. Founded in France in 1975, Ipsos has grown into a worldwide research group with a strong presence in all key markets. Ipsos ranks fourth in the global research industry.
With offices in 88 countries, Ipsos delivers insightful expertise across five research specializations: brand, advertising and media; customer loyalty; marketing; public affairs research; and survey management.

Ipsos researchers assess market potential and interpret market trends. They develop and build brands. They help clients build long-term relationships with their customers. They test advertising and study audience responses to various media and they measure public opinion around the globe.

Ipsos has been listed on the Paris Stock Exchange since 1999 and generated global revenues of €1,749.5 million in 2018.

The author(s)

  • Mallory Newall Director, US, Public Affairs
  • Nicolas Boyon Senior Vice President, US, Public Affairs

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