Data Dive: How society feels about women’s issues in 2022

In five infographics, we look at what Ipsos’ recent global polling reveals about people's opinions on women from feminism to ageism.

Ipsos | global advisor | women issues | feminism | international women's day

The author(s)

  • Melissa Dunne Public Affairs
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Harvey Weinstein’s shadow still looms large.

While it’s been just over five years since the Weinstein sexual abuse allegations were first widely reported, he’s once again in the spotlight.

This month, the former film producer is once again standing trial related to those allegations (this time in Los Angeles) just as a Hollywood movie based on the investigative reporters’ dogged efforts to break open the Weinstein story is set to hit theatres.

Back in October 2017 when #MeToo trended on social media in response to the scandal it seemed like a watershed moment for women. But more than a half decade later, it’s sometimes hard to not to ask how much things have really improved for women around the world.

There’s the ongoing fight for basic rights in Iran in the wake of the death of Mahsa Amini. While in North America, Hockey Canada continues to grapple with the fallout of sexual assault allegations. And south of the border, the U.S. Supreme Court repealed long-entrenched abortion rights this summer.

Sometimes it can seem the fight for the fair and equal treatment of women has been one step forward and two steps back.

Indeed, scratch beneath the surface of Ipsos Global Advisor polling from 2022 and it’s clear while the Weinstein scandal shone a light on women’s issues back in 2017 there are still many miles to go on the road to true equality for all.

  1. Telling stories
    It took years for many women to speak out publicly in the Weinstein cases and those involved in the Hockey Canada scandal have opted to stay anonymous so far. It’s easy to see why. Even in 2022, 15% of people, on average, across 30 countries agreed women often make up or exaggerate claims of abuse or rape.Ipsos | global advisor | women issues | international women's day

  2. The “f” word 
    In the wake of the #MeToo movement many people proudly declared they were feminists, but despite that progress skepticism remains. A large percentage of both men and women strongly/tended to agree that feminism does more harm than good in polling across 30 countries earlier this year.Ipsos | global advisor | women issues | international women's day
  3. Blame game
    In recent decades it seemed that attitudes about abused women had shifted significantly. Yet, polling for International Women’s Day this March found 15% of people, on average, across 30 countries strongly/tended to agree that violence against women is often provoked by the victim.Ipsos | global advisor | women issues | international women's day
  4. Punishing women
    When the U.S. Supreme Court repealed Roe v. Wade this June it reignited debate about a woman’s right to choose. Ipsos global polling on the heels of that decision found 36% of men (and 27% of women), on average, across 27 countries thought women who had an abortion in a situation where it’s illegal should face a penalty.Ipsos | global advisor | women issues | international women's day
  5. Ageism and sexism collide
    While things are often tough for younger women in our world, things don’t necessarily get easier as women age. People across 27 countries, on average, polled this summer believe women aged 50 and over are less valued by several sectors of society compared to men 50+.Ipsos | global advisor | women issues | international women's day

The author(s)

  • Melissa Dunne Public Affairs

Society