Majority of Brits support the reunification of child refugees with family already in the UK

4 in 5 agree a child should be able to reunite with a parent already living in the UK.

The author(s)

  • Kully Kaur-Ballagan Public Affairs
  • Stephanie Holden Public Affairs
  • Holly Day Public Affairs
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A new Ipsos MORI study on behalf of IMIX, shows that: 

  • Four in five (79%) agree a child should be able to reunite with a parent who already lives in the UK (7% disagree), and three in five (63%) agree that a child should be able to reunite with a sibling who already lives in the UK (13% disagree).
  • However, this falls to a slim majority (51%) for those agreeing a child should be able to reunite with extended family members who already live in the UK (22% disagree)
  • There is a big difference in levels of agreement on these measures between those who voted leave and remain in the 2016 EU referendum vote in 2016 with leave voters being less supportive – particularly with allowing reunification with extended family members. 

Kully Kaur-Ballagan, Research Director ,Ipsos MORI said:

Britain has a long history of giving sanctuary to refugees.  This research shows there is strong support for reuniting child refugees with their family – although the specifics do matter as people are much more supportive of reunification with parents and siblings than wider, extended family.

Technical Details:  

  • Ipsos MORI interviewed a representative sample of 2,1000 online adults aged 18+ across Great Britain between 12 March – 3 April 2020
  • Data are weighted to reflect the population profile.
  • The survey was conducted on behalf of IMIX, the migration communications hub with funding from Unbound Philanthropy and the Barrow Cadbury Trust.
  • Percentage scores are shown out of 100%. Where figures do not add up to 100%, this is due to computer rounding. An asterisk indicates a score less than 0.5%, but greater than zero.
  • Combined figures are based on the constituent parts (e.g. % agree = % strongly agree + % tend to agree). These figures are also subject to the effect of rounding

The author(s)

  • Kully Kaur-Ballagan Public Affairs
  • Stephanie Holden Public Affairs
  • Holly Day Public Affairs