The State of the Nation 2018

The UK Social Research Institute reviews the state of the nation in 2018, drawing on key trends and developments that have touched the nation from Brexit to the NHS.

The State of the Nation 2018

The author(s)

  • Gideon Skinner Head of Political Research
  • Sophie Wilson Ipsos Public Affairs, UK
  • Cameron Garrett Ipsos Public Affairs, UK
Get in touch

With the year nearly at an end, we have reflected on the highlights (and lowlights) of 2018 to bring together our thoughts on the current mood of the nation. Leveraging data from our regular global surveys, Ipsos Thinks publications and broader research, the 2018 state of the nation roundup provides a snapshot of what the country has been talking and worrying about this year, with insights from across our work in the public sector and wider society.

While concern about the EU has risen considerably since 2010, worries about the economy have fallen in priority. 3% say the economy was the biggest issue facing Britain today, down from 7% in 2017.

 

Further key findings include:

Immigration: Public concern about immigration has fallen considerably since the vote for Brexit in 2016 and continues to decline; in September 2018, 21% of Britons considered immigration to be the worrying issue facing Britain today, down from 26% at the same time in 2017.

National unease: Seven in ten 16-75 year-olds currently thinks that the UK is heading in the ‘wrong direction’

Austerity: The number of people feeling the impact of cuts has stabilised but remains around a third, compared to a quarter in 2016

Gender Equality: Only one in four Britons agree that giving women equal rights with men has gone far enough – among the lowest in the world

Environment: After a record-breaking summer, Britons are talking more and more about the environment. Most Britons are concerned about the over-packaging of consumer goods, and Brits would be more likely to change their behaviours than pay more to tackle the overuse of plastic We hope you enjoy reading this year’s highlights.

The Social Research Institute remains committed to producing insights of our research, analysis, and other contextual data, in the hope that this will inform the debate among our readers on these important topics. If you would like to discuss any of the research here, please do not hesitate to contact us.

 

The author(s)

  • Gideon Skinner Head of Political Research
  • Sophie Wilson Ipsos Public Affairs, UK
  • Cameron Garrett Ipsos Public Affairs, UK