US Millennials are most likely to identify as "working class"

New analysis by Ipsos MORI of the General Social Survey has found that a majority of Millennials (those adults born since 1980 - known as "Generation Y" in the UK) identify as working class.

US Millennials are most likely to identify as "working class"

New analysis by Ipsos MORI of the General Social Survey, a face-to-face randomly selected survey of Americans, has found that a majority of Millennials (those adults born since 1980 – also known as “Generation Y” in the UK) identify as working class – in 2014 56 per cent of this generation said they belonged in the working class.

The figures for other generations are lower – in the same year 50% of Generation X members (those born 1966-1979) and 44% of Baby Boomers (those born 1945-1965) said they felt that they belonged to the working class.

 

This finding is mirrored in the proportions who consider themselves to be “middle class” – Millennials are the least likely to identify with this category, with 35% saying they belong to the middle class, compared with 40% of Generation X and 44% of Baby Boomers who say the same thing. Since around 2000, there has been a trend of decreasing identification with the middle class amongst all generations bar the oldest (those born before 1945).

 

Technical note

Ipsos MORI re-analysed data from the long-running General Social Survey (GSS) series, which records detailed information about the American population. The survey employs a random selection methodologies, and uses face-to-face interviewing to collect data, and all point in our analysis represent sample sizes of at least 150 responses.

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