Americans will face more traffic and complexity in hybrid work world

Ipsos finds that Americans’ desire for “flex in the city” will mean a bumpy reentry

The author(s)

  • Matt Carmichael Vice President, Editorial Strategy, North America
  • Mallory Newall Vice President, US, Public Affairs
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NEW YORK, June 17, 2021 – As American workplaces reopen, a new Ipsos study predicts that two patterns will emerge: more traffic and an upheaval in commuting routines. These shifts will alter the behavioral and business patterns that companies, workers, their families and businesses had built in the past, according to Ipsos' Commuting issue of What the Future magazine.

Besides different routines for morning and evening, for many, there will now be dual in-office days and work-from-home days. One quarter of Americans expect their commutes to change. Of those, 57% expect to drive to work more often, while 21% expect to drive less overall since they’ll be working from home. These changes will profoundly affect where and how people live, their sleep patterns, apparel, grooming, meals and snacks, and how they get around.

For example, 41% of people currently working from home say if their employer expected them to return to the office full time, they would consider looking for another job that didn’t require them to return to the office, given the same salary and responsibility.

Along with these insights, in this issue of What the Future, Ipsos asks auto, urban design and transportation experts four major questions:

  • Dustin Krause, director of e-Mobility, Volkswagen North America —Will people change cars if they commute less?
  • Richard Florida, urban theorist, professor, author of “Rise of the Creative Class” —Did the pandemic doom mass transit? 
  • Zabe Bent, director of design, National Association of City Transportation Officials —Will hybrid commuting models change how people use public transportation?
  • Ellen Dunham-Jones, director of the Urban Design program, Georgia Tech —Can a little hybrid go a long way to changing our commutes? 

In addition, the commuting issue features guidance by Ipsos researchers with solutions for brands to help consumers establish new routines. The full issue is here. Below are research highlights followed by a topline of the survey results:

  • When asked about the right post-pandemic mix of working from home versus working at the office, 50% of people currently working from home want to work from home, 28% want to evenly split working from home and office, and 17% want to work at the office.
  • 61% of people drive their own vehicle daily while 9% say they never drive; 9% of people walk a half mile or more to get somewhere other than for exercise or enjoyment while 47% say they never walk; 3% of people use public transportation daily while 69% say they never do.
  • 77% of those who commute from a suburb to downtown want flexibility in the amount of time they go to the office; 76% of those who commute to or within suburbs agree and 72% of those who commute to or within an urban area agree.
  • 85% of Americans have heard of self-driving cars and 57% of Millennials have a positive view of them.
  • 69% of people say they never use public transportation like a train or bus.
  • 53% of people say they don’t walk to local amenities where they live.

These are the findings of an Ipsos poll conducted between May 13-17, 2021. For this survey, a sample of 2,010 adults age 18+ from the continental U.S., Alaska, and Hawaii was interviewed online in English. The poll has a credibility interval of plus or minus 2.5 percentage points for all respondents.

For full results, please refer to the following annotated questionnaire here:

About the Study

These are some of the findings of an Ipsos poll conducted between May 13-17, 2021. For this survey, a sample of 2,010 adults age 18+ from the continental U.S., Alaska, and Hawaii was interviewed online in English.

The sample was randomly drawn from Ipsos’ online panel, partner online panel sources, and “river” sampling and does not rely on a population frame in the traditional sense. Ipsos uses fixed sample targets, unique to each study, in drawing a sample. After a sample has been obtained from the Ipsos panel, Ipsos calibrates respondent characteristics to be representative of the U.S. Population using standard procedures such as raking-ratio adjustments. The source of these population targets is U.S. Census 2018 American Community Survey data. The sample drawn for this study reflects fixed sample targets on demographics. Posthoc weights were made to the population characteristics on gender, age, race/ethnicity, region, and education. 

Statistical margins of error are not applicable to online non-probability polls. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error and measurement error. Where figures do not sum to 100, this is due to the effects of rounding. The precision of Ipsos online polls is measured using a credibility interval. In this case, the poll has a credibility interval of plus or minus 2.5 percentage points for all respondents. Ipsos calculates a design effect (DEFF) for each study based on the variation of the weights, following the formula of Kish (1965). This study had a credibility interval adjusted for design effect of the following (n=2,010, DEFF=1.5, adjusted Confidence Interval=+/-4.0 percentage points).

For more information on this news release, please contact:

Matt Carmichael
Editor, What the Future and
Vice President, Editorial Strategy
Ipsos North America
+1 312 218 7922
[email protected]

Mallory Newall
Director, US
Public Affairs
+1 202 420-2014
[email protected]

About Ipsos

Ipsos is the world’s third largest Insights and Analytics company, present in 90 markets and employing more than 18,000 people.

Our passionately curious research professionals, analysts and scientists have built unique multi-specialist capabilities that provide true understanding and powerful insights into the actions, opinions and motivations of citizens, consumers, patients, customers or employees. We serve more than 5000 clients across the world with 75 business solutions.

Founded in France in 1975, Ipsos is listed on the Euronext Paris since July 1st, 1999. The company is part of the SBF 120 and the Mid-60 index and is eligible for the Deferred Settlement Service (SRD).

ISIN code FR0000073298, Reuters ISOS.PA, Bloomberg IPS:FP

www.ipsos.com

The publication of these findings abides by local rules and regulations.

The author(s)

  • Matt Carmichael Vice President, Editorial Strategy, North America
  • Mallory Newall Vice President, US, Public Affairs

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