Unlocking the value of reputation

Looking to make your company run more effectively and efficiently? Management teams around the world face a variety of complex business situations daily. A great place to start boosting your business is by leveraging the power of your reputation. Our research across 31 countries shows conclusive proof of the relationship between a good reputation and better business efficiency.

The author(s)

  • Trent Ross Corporate Reputation, US
  • Milorad Ajder Global Service Line Leader, Corporate Reputation, UK
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The definitive link between corporate reputation and better business efficiency

Looking to make your company run more effectively and efficiently? Management teams around the world face a variety of complex business situations daily. A great place to start boosting your business is by leveraging the power of your reputation.

Ipsos Global Reputation Centre research across 31 countries shows conclusive proof of the relationship between a good reputation and better business efficiency.

UNLOCKING THE VALUE OF REPUTATION | Ipsos

Our research explores:


Building trust gives companies an advantage in telling their story in times of crisis, marketing their products efficiently, and turning stakeholders into advocates.


Reputation and trust are powerful forces in business efficiency.

The social media landscape may be changing how people interact with companies. There may be regulatory issues impacting some sectors more than others. You may be doing business in a region that’s inherently more skeptical than the rest of the world.

But the bottom line remains the same: building trust builds reputation. and having a good reputation will result in better business efficiency.

How does reputation influence purchase decision?

Reputation is a key consideration in purchase decisions.

The vast majority (87%) of consumers around the world say that they take the reputation of the company into account when purchasing a product or service. There are regional differences in intensity. Consumers in Latin America and the Middle East/ Africa are the most likely to say they are “very likely” to take reputation into account. Consumers in Europe feel less strongly about taking reputation into account (just 24% “very likely”), but still a vast majority (79%) say they take reputation into account to some extent.

We hope you find the report interesting and informative and, as ever, would welcome any thoughts or feedback you may have.

Methodology: The latest wave of the Ipsos Global Reputation Monitor, conducted in September 2017, measured attitudes of more than 23,000 consumers from 31 countries toward 66 companies across nine industries.

The author(s)

  • Trent Ross Corporate Reputation, US
  • Milorad Ajder Global Service Line Leader, Corporate Reputation, UK

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