Americans proud and looking to celebrate this July 4th

The July 4th weekend is here, and while Americans have mixed feeling about their country, they will be celebrating, COVID or not.

The author(s)

  • Sarah Feldman Data Journalist, US, Public Affairs
  • Catherine Morris Data Journalist, US, Public Affairs
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July 1, 2021—The July 4th weekend is here, and while Americans have mixed feeling about their country, they will be celebrating, COVID or not.

Americans are generally proud of their country, even if right now it’s more complicated

Most people are proud to be an American, new polling released ahead of July 4th finds. But as for feeling proud of the country as a whole in the present moment? That’s a bit more complicated.

Close to seven in ten Americans feel proud of being an American. However, when asked if they are proud ‘right now’, only two in five still express that pride, according to Ipsos polling. This goes hand in hand with other findings showing that many Americans are doubtful that the country is headed in the right direction, and majority belief that the country needs to be “made strong” again.

How Americans feel about the country looks different across the generations, with older Americans showing greater pride in both being an American and of the country as it is right now than younger Americans.

Vaccinated still feel July 4th festivities carry some risk, while the unvaccinated aren’t so sure

Americans are much less worried about celebrating July 4th this year. Last summer, 78% saw celebrating the Fourth as a large or moderate risk, compared to 41% today. Yet not all Americans see it the same way.

Unvaccinated Americans are more likely to see celebrating the Fourth as “no risk” to their health and well-being than the vaccinated while the vaccinated still show more caution.

This absence of fear about the potential risks of mingling and socializing on the Fourth among the unvaccinated is driven by those who do not plan to ever get the vaccine, 45% of whom say that celebrating poses no risk. In contrast, just 15% of those who plan to get the vaccine at some point see it as risk-free.

The unvaccinated more likely to throw pre-COVID style July 4th celebrations

Most Americans who are planning to celebrate the Fourth of July plan to do so much as they have in the past. But how the vaccinated and unvaccinated intend to celebrate looks a bit different.

Only one in three vaccinated Americans plan to return to pre-COVID style Fourth of July celebrations this year. Nearly half of the unvaccinated, conversely, plan to celebrate in the same manner as they did before COVID, according to the Ipsos Consumer COVID Tracker.

This speaks to the fundamental and ongoing divide in how risky COVID seems to segments of the public. Last year, some states and localities traced a spike in cases to July 4th celebrations, which remain a risk for the unvaccinated this year as well.

Cookouts and fireworks most popular Fourth of July plans

Few surprises here –cookouts (44%) and fireworks (38%) with friends and family are the most popular Fourth of July plans.

While these Independence Day past times are popular across all age groups, Millennials and Gen Z-er’s are about twice as likely to set off fireworks than Boomers.

What may surprise consumers is the price of fireworks. Reports of hiked prices and firework shortages abound as pandemic-related supply chain issues impact Americans' ability to access fireworks for the Fourth.

The author(s)

  • Sarah Feldman Data Journalist, US, Public Affairs
  • Catherine Morris Data Journalist, US, Public Affairs

Society