Family estrangement survey for Stand Alone

A new Ipsos MORI survey for the charity Stand Alone has shown that over a quarter (27%) of the British public know somebody who is no longer in contact with a family member.

The author(s)

A new Ipsos MORI survey for the charity Stand Alone has shown that over a quarter (27%) of the GB public know somebody who is no longer in contact with a family member. 8% of those surveyed said they were personally estranged from a family member.

The figures show little variation in terms of gender breakdown, with negligible differences between men and women in terms of their answers. The figures stay consistent across class breakdown and earnings, yet the regional breakdown showed a lower incidence of estrangement in London versus the rest of the country.

This preliminary research points to the fact that family estrangement permeates all types of families, including those who consider themselves highly educated and earning well above the national average wage.

Technical note

The survey was conducted on Capibus, Ipsos MORI’s weekly face-to-face Omnibus survey. Interviews were conducted in-home using CAPI (computer-aided personal interviewing) method, among a sample of 2,082 adults aged 15+. Interviewing took place between 12th – 18th September 2014. Data were weighted to known population figures for age, region, social grade and working status within gender and non-interlocking targets for household tenure and ethnicity.

The author(s)

  • Ipsos MORI

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