Women and COVID: One Year On

Understanding how women’s experiences have varied throughout the pandemic is essential for addressing the inequities that will permeate the pandemic recovery landscape.

The author(s)

  • Chris Jackson Senior Vice President, US, Public Affairs
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Over the past year, the coronavirus pandemic tore through society, fundamentally reconfiguring how we live and work. It also brought to light, or exacerbated, existing inequities in the United States. For women, the economic consequences of the virus have been particularly severe, chipping away at their standing in the workforce and exacerbating underlying financial inequality. Mothers are disproportionately picking up the slack around childcare, with further ramifications for their standing in the workforce.

Since the pandemic began, women have reported lower consumer confidence than men. And women, but particularly women of color, report higher levels of concern about household debt and job security. While the pandemic exacted a heavy toll on women as a group, they are not monolithic. How women fared economically and emotionally during the first year of the pandemic depends largely on factors such as race or ethnicity, parental status, and political affiliation. Understanding the many intersections women live in is the first step in addressing these inequities when building back a post-COVID world.

Download our paper for deeper insights into how the pandemic transformed women’s lives over the past year.

For more on this topic, please see our International Women’s Day survey results.

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The author(s)

  • Chris Jackson Senior Vice President, US, Public Affairs

Society